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ZEISS DTI thermal imaging cameras. For more discoveries at night, and during the day.

10x low light binoculars for around €1000 ? (1 Viewer)

Go straight to 10x50. Actually, people tend to sell them used on the net these days, so you can get nice ones used.

Edmund
There are some huge x50 Nikon Porros in my local shop that cost about 150 clams. At that price, you could just get them as a special purpose buy, and see if the magnification is really what you want. The added advantage is a 3D effect from the objective separation.

My own experience testing Zeiss SF is that even that superb 10x42 tends to go meh in low contrast situations, eg overcast winter afternoons, I wouldn’t have expectations in low light of any binocular I haven’t tried, alpha or not.

Edmund
 
There are some huge x50 Nikon Porros in my local shop that cost about 150 clams. At that price, you could just get them as a special purpose buy, and see if the magnification is really what you want. The added advantage is a 3D effect from the objective separation.

My own experience testing Zeiss SF is that even that superb 10x42 tends to go meh in low contrast situations, eg overcast winter afternoons, I wouldn’t have expectations in low light of any binocular I haven’t tried, alpha or not.

Edmund
Agreed.
 

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A porro would be nice. That's why I am leaning towards the Habicht 10x40. The Habicht 7x42 could be interesting as well, but then, it is 7 power instead of 10. I will send an e-mail to Swarovski to make a Habicht 10x50 or SLC 10x50 ;)

So for 50mm porro's Nikon is the brand I assume.
 
A porro would be nice. That's why I am leaning towards the Habicht 10x40. The Habicht 7x42 could be interesting as well, but then, it is 7 power instead of 10. I will send an e-mail to Swarovski to make a Habicht 10x50 or SLC 10x50 ;)

So for 50mm porro's Nikon is the brand I assume.
Nikon have a bunch of easy to get value instruments. Habicht are the best transmission x42 but a cheap 50 will still probably be in the same league as a very good 42 on light gathering alone. That’s like comparing a truck to a van. DO A TEST.
 
A porro would be nice. That's why I am leaning towards the Habicht 10x40. The Habicht 7x42 could be interesting as well, but then, it is 7 power instead of 10. I will send an e-mail to Swarovski to make a Habicht 10x50 or SLC 10x50 ;)

So for 50mm porro's Nikon is the brand I assume.
The Nikon A-EX 10x50 are an option IF you can live with the huge round eye pieces obviously conceived for a flatter facial terrain than is common in our geographical area. I found them to give a good view for the money but impossible to fit my nose between the eye pieces while still aligning my pupils with the exit pupils. So they were always floating in front of my face admitting loads of stray light and reducing the FOV.
 
There are some rather compact 10x56 out there. That's what I'd choose. I have a 10x56 DDoptics "Nighteagle" (400€) that is actually brighter than the 10x60 Oberwerk Mariner porro (which is huuuuge).
Comparison pic, from left to right - Fuji FMTR, Nighteagle 10x56, Fuji HC 8x42.
img080dje.jpg
 
I have a 10x56 DDoptics "Nighteagle" (400€) that is actually brighter

Thanks for sharing. That looks like a nice option as well! The looks are nice as well. For me that is important as well ;).

How is the view? I am afraid I am a bit spoiled with my two swarovski's. Will I still enjoy and grab binoculars which are optically less strong?
You are a binocollecter and have many binoculars. Isn't that what you experience? Don't you grap the better binoculars?
I am afraid I will still get the SLC 8x42 when I am out at dawn and forget the "inferior" binoculars.
 
I am still curious about the Conquest 10x42 as well. I've read it is a bright pair of binoculars, brighter than the 90% transmission suggests. The FOV of 115mm is nice as well. Any Conquest 10x42 fans around here?
 
I am afraid I will still get the SLC 8x42 when I am out at dawn and forget the "inferior" binoculars.
That is a very real danger :D. I bought the 10x56 mainly for astronomy and it really shines for that. But it suffers from some CA during the day. Might be in part because of the compact size. But the sharpness is outstanding.
 
The point that very few contributors to these discussions about low light binoculars ever address is just what do you mean by low light? Near darkness? First light on a clear day? Sunrise on a heavily overcast day? Do you expect your light to be increasing or fading?

You mention wanting to see deer, boar etc. - well, if so, the 8x56 has been a great favourite amongst German and other European hunters for its ability to see game very early and very late. Docter made a highly rated 8x56 porro that you might be able to obtain for €1000 or less (try Ebay Germany) or you might be able to get an 8x56 Dialyt T*P for about the same price. If you need a 10x and do not wish to use a x56 you might want to search for a 10x50 Fujinon FMTR (but this is individual focus) or maybe a 10x50 Meopta Meostar (not sure if the latter will fit your budget).
 
There are some rather compact 10x56 out there. That's what I'd choose. I have a 10x56 DDoptics "Nighteagle" (400€) that is actually brighter than the 10x60 Oberwerk Mariner porro (which is huuuuge).
Comparison pic, from left to right - Fuji FMTR, Nighteagle 10x56, Fuji HC 8x42.
img080dje.jpg
It seems the size of the DDoptics Nighteagle ERGO 10x56 Gen 3 DX is very compact. Do you use it for lowlight birdwatching purposes other than using it for stargazing? I am also curious whether you compared it with other DDoptics models (i.e., DDoptics Nighthawk Ergo Gen 3.1 10x56 green and DDoptics Pirschler 10x56 Gen.3). They have a bit more FOV. Did you buy this model due to its compact size/agronomy compared to the Pirschler with AK prisms?

I was not really looking into buying a lowlight pair of binoculars however, after seeing this photo and seeing the affordable price, now I am interested in buying one. The other reason is I compared my UV 10x32 with 100 euro Olympus 10x50 Porro and was able to see more details in the dusk. I was able to see through dark patches with Olympus while I did not see anything with UV. It seems the DDoptics model would be brighter than my Olympus Porro or even brighter than my 10x40 Habicht. So, it will be a good addition. Anyway, if I buy a 10x56, I will use it solely for lowlight observations. Therefore, CA or a bit inferior image quality in good light conditions would not let it down. However, as you are a very experienced binoculars user and a collector, your advice will be highly valuable. Please let me know if you know of any better lowlight binoculars models under 1000 euro limit as well.
 
I've some experience with low light viewing. I have a Conquest HD in 10x42. It's breathtaking in low light and a good option if you gotta have a 42mm bin. It's probably the best at the $1000 in a 42mm. However, it is not brighter in low light than my 10x50 vortex viper (older model made in Japan). They're really good in low light. I have a porro in 8x40 but it isn't in the same league as the others being a lower end model. I have desired to have another 10x50 for low light viewing. The Maven b6 in 10x50 is intriguing to me. I have also considered a maven b2 in 9x45, but I havent had a chance to look through either of them yet. Both have 5mm exit pupils. The main drawback of a 10x50 is the narrower field of view, which is why I sold my vipers. The B6 appeals to me because of a FOV just a little less than the conquest at 341' vs 345' at 1000 yards.The Maven b2 has an outstanding FOV but more bulk. An AK binocular would give a slight advantage over a Schmidt in the same configuration. If you take a page from the astro community, aperature is king in low light. And large aperature AK's would be best but there's a trade offs in weight and bulk. Some have mentioned Vortex UHD which is a good recommendation, but also conquests in 10x56mm could also be an ideal choice if your priority is low light veiwing. Let us know what you picked.
 
Light transmission is largely a function of the surface area of the objective lens. A 50mm lens has 41% greater area than a 42mm objective lens. At most the lens coatings may increase light transmission by 5% so the size of the objectives is the critical factor.

In low light our eyes ability to discern color is greatly reduced so not much gain by getting glass with less in the way of color aberration at a far higher cost. For marine use any 7x50 bino is going to be as good optically as another and one pays primarily for toughness of construction to resist impacts and water.

One can spend $450,000 for a Rolls Royce or $30,000 for a Toyota Prius and the Rolls is not 12x as good in any respect other than perceived status.
 

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