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Bartley reservoir (1 Viewer)

the Harborne Flyer

Well-known member
Please explain?
Both of these species breed in the West Mids region but are very localised; nightjar breed on Cannock Chase and perhaps near Newcastle under Lyme ; nightingale in England is on the edge of its European range and is just clinging on by its fingertips in the southern part of Warwickshire ( only 2 records in 2017 as per WMBC Annual Report) and 15 pairs at 6 sites in south Worcs in 2017.

Both are rarely seen on passage away from breeding sites and in the case of nightingales recorders usually count singing males ,such is their skulking nature . Many nightjar will have already arrived in the UK but there may be some still migrating through so you may have seen one, but to see both species in the same wood on the same day is statistically improbable.

Nightingale's range is contracting to the east and south-east of England with the most northerly birds on the Notts/ Lincs/ Sth Yorkshire border near to Doncaster. The numbers are also declining and deer are being cited as the main cause due their habit of grazing the lower branches of coppiced trees, the domain of the nightingale where it feeds, nests and sings to establish a territory,
Hope this clarifies things.
 

rollingthunder

Well-known member
There does still appear to to be migrant species still arriving due to the blocking high pressure that has been dominating the UK for the last 6 weeks. There is certainly suitable habitat for displaying passage migrants here in the Midlands - i will be checking recently cleared Conifers locally as there is little disturbance from dog-walkers unlike the established well-known lowland heath areas.

Nightingale could be mistaken for Garden Warbler to the inexperienced eye. The days of this species singing and breeding e.g. the 80’s appear to be over at present. Unlike on the Continent (West) where every bit of scrub seems to hold them here in the UK, on their peripheral range, coppice management appears to be a factor. I check the Woodland Trust reserve of Pepper Wood locally as this is a specific ‘coppice with standards’ c/w anti-Deer fencing to allow regrowth. The last singing Nightjar i heard around here was at Hurcott Wood, Kidderminster, about a decade ago. The habitat there is now much better for this and Cetti’s that i found singing a coupla years ago. I read somewhere that range expansion by Marsh Warbler in Central/Northern France meant earlier-arriving males were responsible for a possible decline in the tiny UK population - perhaps a similar scenario is happening with populations of Nightingales outside of their South-East Hazel copse comfort zone?

Good birding -

Laurie:t:
 
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the Harborne Flyer

Well-known member
There does still appear to to be migrant species still arriving due to the blocking high pressure that has been dominating the UK for the last 6 weeks. There is certainly suitable habitat for displaying passage migrants here in the Midlands - i will be checking recently cleared Conifers locally as there is little disturbance from dog-walkers unlike the established well-known lowland heath areas.

Nightingale could be mistaken for Garden Warbler to the inexperienced eye. The days of this species singing and breeding e.g. the 80’s appear to be over at present. Unlike on the Continent (West) where every bit of scrub seems to hold them here in the UK, on their peripheral range, coppice management appears to be a factor. I check the Woodland Trust reserve of Pepper Wood locally as this is a specific ‘coppice with standards’ c/w anti-Deer fencing to allow regrowth. The last singing Nightjar i heard around here was at Hurcott Wood, Kidderminster, about a decade ago. The habitat there is now much better for this and Cetti’s that i found singing a coupla years ago. I read somewhere that range expansion by Marsh Warbler in Central/Northern France meant earlier-arriving males were responsible for a possible decline in the tiny UK population - perhaps a similar scenario is happening with populations of Nightingales outside of their South-East Hazel copse comfort zone?

Good birding -

Laurie:t:
Garden warbler sounds a pretty good bet for the bird seen by Mrs JC.
 

Mrs JC

Member
Thank you for the informative replies both.
Much appreciated.
I’m certain it was a nightjar, the noise it made was very unusual and easy to identify. Not many birds that size and shape. I went back at dusk and later on after dark hoping to hear something but it must have already moved on.

Yes I did look at the garden warbler, that seemed to have more markings than what I saw, not many photos online either so hard to tell. It looked like it had just two colours, light on breast and tawny to almost copper brown on head back and wings. It was clinging on to a plant and looked long and slender for its size. I’m sure with more experience it will become easier to be sure. I saw it at the far side of res, where Scotland Lane meets Church Hill. There is a gap in the bushes that leads to a path that follows the edge of the res, it’s very dense with lots of brambles. Takes you through a few bushes(where I spotted the deer) and a farmers field, then on to a further grassy area, ending at Genners Lane. Lots of activity along there. Will be going back when my binoculars arrive ��
 

Mrs JC

Member
Tried some farmland this morning, off Scotland lane. Walked up through 3 fields, as far as the housing estate.

Skylark

Femal phesant
Male phesant
Goldfinches
Lots of sparrows
 

the Harborne Flyer

Well-known member
Thank you for the informative replies both.
Much appreciated.
I’m certain it was a nightjar, the noise it made was very unusual and easy to identify. Not many birds that size and shape. I went back at dusk and later on after dark hoping to hear something but it must have already moved on.

Yes I did look at the garden warbler, that seemed to have more markings than what I saw, not many photos online either so hard to tell. It looked like it had just two colours, light on breast and tawny to almost copper brown on head back and wings. It was clinging on to a plant and looked long and slender for its size. I’m sure with more experience it will become easier to be sure. I saw it at the far side of res, where Scotland Lane meets Church Hill. There is a gap in the bushes that leads to a path that follows the edge of the res, it’s very dense with lots of brambles. Takes you through a few bushes(where I spotted the deer) and a farmers field, then on to a further grassy area, ending at Genners Lane. Lots of activity along there. Will be going back when my binoculars arrive ��

If this bird has copper-coloured wings it may be a common whitethroat, which is also "long and slender".
 

luckyosprey4

Well-known member
It really does come to something when you have casually watched a Midlands site like Bartley for a few years and you see Whooper Swan before Mute. Thankfully 3 Mute dropped in this morning and filled a gaping hole in my list for the reservoir. Also 2 Grey Wagtail were along the shoreline and a solitary pair of Tufted Duck were on the water. Canada Goose and Mallard both have broods.

Chris
 

the Harborne Flyer

Well-known member
It really does come to something when you have casually watched a Midlands site like Bartley for a few years and you see Whooper Swan before Mute. Thankfully 3 Mute dropped in this morning and filled a gaping hole in my list for the reservoir. Also 2 Grey Wagtail were along the shoreline and a solitary pair of Tufted Duck were on the water. Canada Goose and Mallard both have broods.

Chris
very true, mute swans are n't common at Bartley. A few weeks ago there was a pair of shoveler, another irregular bird
 

luckyosprey4

Well-known member
very true, mute swans are n't common at Bartley. A few weeks ago there was a pair of shoveler, another irregular bird

Yes I've still not caught up with shoveler at the res but had my first teal a while back. A single lapwing was along the shoreline this morning which was good to see and only my third wader here after common sand and redshank.

Chris
 

the Harborne Flyer

Well-known member
Yes I've still not caught up with shoveler at the res but had my first teal a while back. A single lapwing was along the shoreline this morning which was good to see and only my third wader here after common sand and redshank.

Chris

This spring avocet ,green and common sand, LRP, oystercatcher and sanderling have all put in an appearance at Bartley but waders don't tend to stop long here.
 

luckyosprey4

Well-known member
Arrived at 7.50 this morning and found 5 drake Common Scoter out in the centre of the reservoir. At first they looked quite flighty but they were still.present before I left at 9.10 they had begun diving but probably finding very little.

Chris
 

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luckyosprey4

Well-known member
And a nice find:t:

Could do with one, or more, of the blighters a bit closer to home:C

Good birding -

Laurie:t:

Thanks Laurie and well done on the Long-Tailed Duck- these birds are the reason we visit relatively less productive sites, and personally the satisfaction is greater in finding one's own scarcities at a less-watched location :t:

Chris
 

luckyosprey4

Well-known member
After the 5 Common Scoter on Wednesday, a single drake has been present since Thursday and the bird remained in the centre of the reservoir this morning, diving regularly.

Chris
 

luckyosprey4

Well-known member
Some movement was evident at Bartley this morning, with the main highlight being a single Common Sandpiper along the far shoreline. Tufted Duck, having numbered on average between 7 and 10 birds recently, have risen to 27. Black-Headed Gull have steadily increased since singles at the end of June and today there were 33 birds including 7 juveniles. A pair of adult Goldfinch with their two young was also good to see.

Chris
 

luckyosprey4

Well-known member
A Kingfisher seen in flight then perched along the southern shoreline was my first at the reservoir this morning. Also 1 Common Sandpiper and 100+ Lesser Black-Backed Gull.

Chris
 

luckyosprey4

Well-known member
6 Common Scoter (3m+3f) were present on the reservoir when we arrived at 7.15am and seemed to have departed by 7.40am at the latest. This continues a good run of sightings of this species at Bartley.

Chris
 

the Harborne Flyer

Well-known member
6 Common Scoter (3m+3f) were present on the reservoir when we arrived at 7.15am and seemed to have departed by 7.40am at the latest. This continues a good run of sightings of this species at Bartley.

Chris

Paid another visit this morning and there may be some truth in the old adage that rain brings birds down ,plus the fact that the water level is down exposing some attractive shingly shoreline in the south western corner which held common and green sand with an oystercatcher on the grass above the shore. By the church along the track beyond the house there was a spotted flycatcher and a very yellowy willow warbler. Last weekend there were still a few whitethroats around in the scrubby grassland and a reed bunting was still entering an obvious nest carrying food.
 

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