Collared-doves (1 Viewer)

Maroon Jay

Airborne
Canada
Can someone please tell me the difference between these two birds. The Eurasion Collared-dove (Streptopelia Decaocto) (aka Ringed Turtle-dove) and the African Collared-dove (Streptopelia Risoria) (aka Barbary Dove) look alike to me. They have different scientific names so must be two different birds. One is from Asia and one from Africa. What is the difference? What would I look for to ID one of these birds? Thank you.
 

Microtus

Maryland USA (he/his)
United States
The Ringed Turtle-Dove (which the first edition of the Collins guide, and other, earlier, field guides, called Barbary Dove), Streptopelia risoria, has been determined to be a domesticated form of the African Turtle-Dove, Streptopelia roseogrisea. It is confined to Africa. The Eurasian Collared-Dove, Streptopelia decaocto, spread across Europe during the past many decades from southwest & south Asia.

According to the National Geographic Field Guide to the Birds of North America, the former may form small populations but rarely does well in the wild. It is shorter than Eurasian Collared Dove, has gray not black primaries, whitish not grayish undertail coverts, and has much less black on the underside of its shorter tail. The calls differ as well: African Collared/Ringed Turtle- Doves give a two-syllable call, while the Eurasian Collared-Dove gives a three-syllable call.
 
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njlarsen

Well-known member
Opus Editor
From our Opus page for Eurasian Collared Dove

Similar Species

Very similar to the African Collared Dove and other members of its genus; in much of the range the most likely member to be confused is Ringed Turtle Dove which probably is a domestic form of African Collared Dove; in the USA this is a rare and local feral bird, with established breeding colonies only in some southern cities, notably in California, but it is a frequent escape. Ringed Turtle Dove has white undertail coverts while this area is grey and often the darkest part of the belly in Eurasian Collared-Dove.

In practice, I feel that the relative dark/paleness of undertail coverts vs rest of underside is easier to judge than for example primary color (not very dark in a lot of Eurasian Collared Dove)

Niels

PS: scientific names have capitalized first part but non-capitalized second part, so for example Streptopelia decaocto (and not Streptopelia Decaocto)
 

Maroon Jay

Airborne
Canada
The reason I ask is that I have seen both of these birds but not in their native countries. The Eurasian form is thriving in Arizona and south into Mexico and have recently spread into Belize where I saw them last winter. I recently saw the African version in New Zealand. Thank you for the information. I will study them further so that in future I will be able to tell them apart next time I see one in some other country.
 

Microtus

Maryland USA (he/his)
United States
Never heard, may I suggest to use "known in some countries of Europe as Barbary Dove"instead?

My first edition Collins Guide, as well as earlier western Palearctic guides (Peterson and Heinzel, Fitter & Parslow from the 1970) call it Barbary Dove.
 

MJB

Well-known member
The Ringed Turtle-Dove (which the first edition of the Collins guide, and other, earlier, field guides, called Barbary Dove), Streptopelia risoria, has been determined to be a domesticated form of the African Turtle-Dove, Streptopelia roseogrisea. It is confined to Africa.

Microtus,
It's the other way round; Africa Collared Dove is risoria, the domesticated form is roseogrisea.

ICZN 2008, Opinion 2215 (thanks, Richard K!), reflected in IOC 3.2 line 5172, column M.
MJB
 

njlarsen

Well-known member
Opus Editor
Microtus,
It's the other way round; Africa Collared Dove is risoria, the domesticated form is roseogrisea.

ICZN 2008, Opinion 2215 (thanks, Richard K!), reflected in IOC 3.2 line 5172, column M.
MJB

I am not sure if I read you wrong or if I disagree: I agree the ruling says that S. risoria is the correct name for African Collared Dove. I do not know that the ruling says that roseogrisea should be correct for the domesticated form? I thought the ruling was based on these two entities being the same?

Niels
 

stonechat1

New member
I´m a bit baffled now.
Since when does a domestic form own a individual scientific name?
AFAIK is the scientific name for the African Collared Dove Streptopelia roseogrisea, a domestic form (= Laughing Dove [Barbary Dove]) of this wild bird can only be Streptopelia roseogrisea forma domestica.
 

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