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Leaving Swarovski for Meopta ? (1 Viewer)

Being birdwatcher, fisher and hunter, a good binocular is always around my neck. Among birdwatchers Meopta is quite unknown at least in Scandinavia but when it comes to hunting-optics it is different, their riflescopes are highly appreciated.
Anyway, for me it is important with good optics and I first tried the Meostar B1 10x42 hd when a friend handed his over to me and I let him try my Swarovski EL 10x 42.
Impressing optics, I thougt and jokingly suggested that we should swap binos right there. Well ,we didn't, but since then I've been interested in the Meostar B1.
As I use the Meostar S2 spotter and a Meostar riflescope, the optical quality was not an issue. The S2 is really superb.

A week ago I bought a Meostar B1.1 10x42 hd from a nice dealer in the Netherlands. So the last days it has been thoroughly tested in various light -conditions and weather.
Compared with my Swarovski EL I notice both cons and pros.
The B1 has a bit shorter eye-relief. Wearing glasses when viewing is easier with the EL.
Edge sharpness is better in the EL which with their flattened lenses keep sharpness out to the edge. (The B1 doesn't show edge sharpness and center sharpness in the same focus.)
Hard to tell but the EL might have a slight advance in brightness at dawn.
The EL reflect blue/blue-green tones in an apparent way. When looking at the sea in cloudy weather the EL turnes the grey waves definitely bluer. Also blue-grey shadows among leaves turns more blue in the EL than what my eye experience. It is somewhat false colours. As we get closer to the trees, rocks or bushes or whatever we look at, the more contrast and warmer tones of color occur. Quite obvious. That's why a spotter or a binocular also must transport both contrast and color fidelity to our eye. The nature gets closer and the warmer colors have to be more visible in the optics than seen at distance without binos. Not getting more blue.

The Meostar B1 has an awesome sharpness and more contrast than the EL in the center (75 % )of the field. Not a big difference but it is visible when comparing. B1 is very much like Leica , my experience.
In low light, at dawn, the B1 has slightly better contrast.
Colors are more natural in the Meostar. Color fidelity and rendition is excellent and is in this matter exactly like the S2.
When looking against sun-reflections at a lake in sunset the Meostar B1 controls stray light apparently better than the Swarovski EL. That the EL has problems handling reflections have been discussed by many users before me. As I spend a lot of time in the swedish archipelago this is important for me.
The build quality of the Meostar B1 and S2 is absolutely very high.

I never use the word alpha for optics. There are of course differences in quality but we can't get it all in one binocular. It is a pity that Meopta as an old and big producer of high quality optics for industry, military and sports is not better known among birdwatchers. The swedish defence industry knows the brand better as the company provides airforce, navy, battlewagons and handheld antitank-weapons with advanced optical systems. Guess Meopta has a lot of orders of that kind these days....

Anyway, this is my personal opinion based on my experiences and testing. For me, the Meostar B1 is a winner and a keeper. It shows very high quality in optics and construction so my Swarovski EL now gives another birdwatcher a sharp and flat view.

Bino-greetings to you all!
 
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Being birdwatcher, fisher and hunter, a good binochular is always around my neck. Among birdwatchers Meopta is quite unknown at least in Scandinavia but when it comes to hunting-optics it is different, their riflescopes are highly appreciated.
Anyway, for me it is important with good optics and I first tried the Meostar B1 10x42 hd when a friend handed his over to me and I let him try my Swarovski EL 10x 42.
Impressing optics, I thougt and jokingly suggested that we should swap binos right there. Well ,we didn't, but since then I've been interested in the Meostar B1.
As I use the Meostar S2 spotter and a Meostar riflescope, the optical quality was not an issue. The S2 is really superb.

A week ago I bought a Meostar B1.1 10x42 hd from a nice dealer in the Netherlands. So the last days it has been thoroughly tested in various light -conditions and weather.
Compared with my Swarovski EL I notice both cons and pros.
The B1 has a bit shorter eye-relief. Wearing glasses when viewing is easier with the EL.
Edge sharpness is better in the EL which with their flattened lenses keep sharpness out to the edge. (The B1 doesn't show edge sharpness and center sharpness in the same focus.)
Hard to tell but the EL might have a slight advance in brightness at dawn.
The EL reflect blue/blue-green tones in an apparent way. When looking at the sea in cloudy weather the EL turnes the grey waves definitely bluer. Also blue-grey shadows among leaves turns more blue in the EL than what my eye experience. It is somewhat false colours. As we get closer to the trees, rocks or bushes or whatever we look at, the more contrast and warmer tones of color occur. Quite obvious. That's why a spotter or a binocular also must transport both contrast and color fidelity to our eye. The nature gets closer and the warmer colours has to be more visible in the optics than seen by distance without binos. Not getting more blue.

The Meostar B1 has an awesome sharpness and more contrast than the EL in the center (75 % )of the field. Not a big difference but it is visible when comparing. B1 is very much like Leica , my experience.
In low light, at dawn, the B1 has slightly better contrast.
Colors are more natural in the Meostar. Color fidelity and rendition is excellent and is in this matter exactly like the S2.
When looking against sun-reflections at a lake in sunset the Meostar B1 controls stray light apparently better than the Swarovski EL. That the EL has problems handling reflections have been discussed by many users before me. As I spend a lot of time in the swedish archipelago this is important for me.
The build quality of the Meostar B1 and S2 is absolutely very high.

I never use the word alpha for optics. There are of course differences in quality but we can't get it all in one binocular. It is a pity that Meopta as an old and big producer of high quality optics for industry, military and sports is not better known among birdwatchers. The swedish defence industry knows the brand better as the company provides airforce, navy, battlewagons and handheld antitank-weapons with advanced optical systems. Guess Meopta has a lot of orders of that kind these days....

Anyway, this is my personal opinion based on my experiences and testing. For me, the Meostar B1 is a winner and a keeper. It shows very high quality in optics and construction so my Swarovski EL now gives another birdwatcher a sharp and flat view.
My experiences have been the same. One thing I have also observed, especially with the S2 that I have, Meopta optics seems to handle heat waves much better than others. How or why I don’t know, but what I do know is that my S2 can “see through” heat shimmer noticeably better than the Nikon EDG, Swarovski ATX and ATS, and Zeiss FL Diascope I compared it against. I have owned all of those but only the S2 remains (and an Opticron MM4 50mm for travel).

Meopta is an “alpha” through and through.
 
My experiences have been the same. One thing I have also observed, especially with the S2 that I have, Meopta optics seems to handle heat waves much better than others. How or why I don’t know, but what I do know is that my S2 can “see through” heat shimmer noticeably better than the Nikon EDG, Swarovski ATX and ATS, and Zeiss FL Diascope I compared it against.
I agree , that is also what I have experienced. Though I have only been able to compare to Kowas and Zeiss Victory Diascope 85 FL.
 
I had the Meostar B1 10x42 HD.
It is very Leica like in its' view, easily comparable to the Ultravid in my opinion.
It is an awesome binocular in every aspect, optics and build.
I only sold it as I wanted to go lighter and smaller, so bought a late model Leica8x32BN (always loved a BN).... but the Meoptas were better optically!!
In fact they are probably one of the very best binoculars I have owned, and I preferred them to Swaro EL's all day long.
In fact I preferred the Moestar to Swaro Pures... and I'm serious!!
But if they are always left at home, then thats no good, so in came 8x32's and more recently 8x20's which are getting a lot of use... regardless of their difficulties.... in my pocket they go.

Meostars are absolutley superb!
 
the Meostar B1 10x42 HD.
It is very Leica like in its' view, easily comparable to the Ultravid in my opinion.
It is an awesome binocular in every aspect, optics and build.
I only sold it as I wanted to go lighter and smaller, so bought a late model Leica8x32BN (always loved a BN).... but the Meoptas were better optically!!

This definitely squares with my (admittedly much more limited) experience. From what I've seen Meostars compare very very well with the Ultravids I've tried, to the point where if you were considering an Ultravid you probably ought to give the comparable Meostar a really good trial.

I wonder if there is anything in the fact that Leica scopes used to be (are still?) made by Meopta, and whether the Meostar diopter is very similar to the old Leica BA/BN.
 
I'm an Meopta addict and still am a bit down that I didn't know about the eyecup fix for the 8x32 when I had the chance to buy it affordable and wound up with a Conquest (which is no slouch either)... I'd just loved to make a full house (10x42hd, 7x42, 8x32) minus scope (still can't afford one, stuck with an old Nikon ed82). Great optics manufacturer, Meopta, though I'm not keen on their hunting profile.
 
This definitely squares with my (admittedly much more limited) experience. From what I've seen Meostars compare very very well with the Ultravids I've tried, to the point where if you were considering an Ultravid you probably ought to give the comparable Meostar a really good trial.

I wonder if there is anything in the fact that Leica scopes used to be (are still?) made by Meopta, and whether the Meostar diopter is very similar to the old Leica BA/BN.
And they have made for Zeiss as well (see photos, look at stickers on box for country of manufacture). People have also discussed/speculated that they have supplied glass for Swarovski (maybe just internet rumor).

Either way, Meopta is clearly in the same league if they are entrusted to literally manufacture products for the top companies.
 

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This definitely squares with my (admittedly much more limited) experience. From what I've seen Meostars compare very very well with the Ultravids I've tried, to the point where if you were considering an Ultravid you probably ought to give the comparable Meostar a really good trial.

I wonder if there is anything in the fact that Leica scopes used to be (are still?) made by Meopta, and whether the Meostar diopter is very similar to the old Leica BA/BN.
The first generation Leica Televids (62mm & 77mm) were certainly Meopta-made. I still use my APO62 and wouldn't change it for any other scope I've looked through.

RB
 
Interesting to see that several watchers and bino-lovers share my experience. I’m looking forward to seing the Meostar B2 when it (hopefully) comes to market. Regardless coatings and prisms, I am quite convinced that it will be built like a tank too.
Better save some money as buying the B2 will be absolutely necessary….😳
 
Being birdwatcher, fisher and hunter, a good binocular is always around my neck. Among birdwatchers Meopta is quite unknown at least in Scandinavia but when it comes to hunting-optics it is different, their riflescopes are highly appreciated.
Anyway, for me it is important with good optics and I first tried the Meostar B1 10x42 hd when a friend handed his over to me and I let him try my Swarovski EL 10x 42.
Impressing optics, I thougt and jokingly suggested that we should swap binos right there. Well ,we didn't, but since then I've been interested in the Meostar B1.
As I use the Meostar S2 spotter and a Meostar riflescope, the optical quality was not an issue. The S2 is really superb.

A week ago I bought a Meostar B1.1 10x42 hd from a nice dealer in the Netherlands. So the last days it has been thoroughly tested in various light -conditions and weather.
Compared with my Swarovski EL I notice both cons and pros.
The B1 has a bit shorter eye-relief. Wearing glasses when viewing is easier with the EL.
Edge sharpness is better in the EL which with their flattened lenses keep sharpness out to the edge. (The B1 doesn't show edge sharpness and center sharpness in the same focus.)
Hard to tell but the EL might have a slight advance in brightness at dawn.
The EL reflect blue/blue-green tones in an apparent way. When looking at the sea in cloudy weather the EL turnes the grey waves definitely bluer. Also blue-grey shadows among leaves turns more blue in the EL than what my eye experience. It is somewhat false colours. As we get closer to the trees, rocks or bushes or whatever we look at, the more contrast and warmer tones of color occur. Quite obvious. That's why a spotter or a binocular also must transport both contrast and color fidelity to our eye. The nature gets closer and the warmer colors have to be more visible in the optics than seen at distance without binos. Not getting more blue.

The Meostar B1 has an awesome sharpness and more contrast than the EL in the center (75 % )of the field. Not a big difference but it is visible when comparing. B1 is very much like Leica , my experience.
In low light, at dawn, the B1 has slightly better contrast.
Colors are more natural in the Meostar. Color fidelity and rendition is excellent and is in this matter exactly like the S2.
When looking against sun-reflections at a lake in sunset the Meostar B1 controls stray light apparently better than the Swarovski EL. That the EL has problems handling reflections have been discussed by many users before me. As I spend a lot of time in the swedish archipelago this is important for me.
The build quality of the Meostar B1 and S2 is absolutely very high.

I never use the word alpha for optics. There are of course differences in quality but we can't get it all in one binocular. It is a pity that Meopta as an old and big producer of high quality optics for industry, military and sports is not better known among birdwatchers. The swedish defence industry knows the brand better as the company provides airforce, navy, battlewagons and handheld antitank-weapons with advanced optical systems. Guess Meopta has a lot of orders of that kind these days....

Anyway, this is my personal opinion based on my experiences and testing. For me, the Meostar B1 is a winner and a keeper. It shows very high quality in optics and construction so my Swarovski EL now gives another birdwatcher a sharp and flat view.

Bino-greetings to you all!
The only trouble with Meopta's is the resale sucks! Every one I have had has been a bear to sell. Nobody want's them, that is why Meopta's optics department laid off 200 employees for lack of demand.

The last Meopta I had was a Meopta Meostar B1 8x56 that retails for $1800. I bought it for $550, and I thought, man I can make some money on this thing if I ever resell it. Well after a while I decided I didn't care for the measly 6.4 degree FOV and I bought an SLC 8x56 for $2000, so I tried to sell it and I started out at $1000.

No interest. No interest. I kept coming down, coming down on the price until after about 3 months I FINALLY sold the darn thing, thank god for the $550 I paid for it. I wouldn't buy a Meopta again unless I can get it for 1/4 of the retail price. True story.
 
The only trouble with Meopta's is the resale sucks! Every one I have had has been a bear to sell. Nobody want's them, that is why Meopta's optics department laid off 200 employees for lack of demand.

The last Meopta I had was a Meopta Meostar B1 8x56 that retails for $1800. I bought it for $550, and I thought, man I can make some money on this thing if I ever resell it. Well after a while I decided I didn't care for the measly 6.4 degree FOV and I bought an SLC 8x56 for $2000, so I tried to sell it and I started out at $1000.

No interest. No interest. I kept coming down, coming down on the price until after about 3 months I FINALLY sold the darn thing, thank god for the $550 I paid for it. I wouldn't buy a Meopta again unless I can get it for 1/4 of the retail price. True story.
Could have more to do with the seller than the brand. Remember the last fiasco with the 8 x 32 Meopta.
 
The only trouble with Meopta's is the resale sucks! Every one I have had has been a bear to sell. Nobody want's them, that is why Meopta's optics department laid off 200 employees for lack of demand.

The last Meopta I had was a Meopta Meostar B1 8x56 that retails for $1800. I bought it for $550, and I thought, man I can make some money on this thing if I ever resell it. Well after a while I decided I didn't care for the measly 6.4 degree FOV and I bought an SLC 8x56 for $2000, so I tried to sell it and I started out at $1000.

No interest. No interest. I kept coming down, coming down on the price until after about 3 months I FINALLY sold the darn thing, thank god for the $550 I paid for it. I wouldn't buy a Meopta again unless I can get it for 1/4 of the retail price. True story.
I have noticed that too. Especially among birders the brand Meopta is quite unknown. Take a look at their catalogs and you’ll see that in every flashy picture it is a hunter or a sportsshooter that holds their optics. Meopta doesn’t do much of advertising among birdwatchers. Too bad. Used optics don’t hold value very well at all but you have a point about used Meopta . It is a bit worse especially in a birders forum.
On the other hand , selling at a hunters market is different. I had a riflescope ( Meostar) bought for 950 euro, changed model after two years and sold this in a day for 780 euro, same with a friend who bought his Meostar B1 8x for 1100 euro and sold it to a hunter for 800 euro. Hunters in those examples.
The market for shooting and hunting is a lot bigger and more important for them but Meopta could do better. Just my thougts.
 
I love it they don't resell well; it makes (almost)alpha-quality optics affordable for poor people like me (and makes a bit of a sucker out of optics junks who rotate too much instead of using them as naturist tools). I got 10x42hd and 7x42 for €600/€550and have made Swaro owners jealous with them. Now just to get a secondhand 8x32 (late b1 is fine) , now I know how to improve the eyecups (and a 12x50 when I ever have money to burn, but never saw that cheaply €1000 lowest) to replace the Conquest and make three in a row :D
 

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