• Welcome to BirdForum, the internet's largest birding community with thousands of members from all over the world. The forums are dedicated to wild birds, birding, binoculars and equipment and all that goes with it.

    Please register for an account to take part in the discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.
ZEISS DTI thermal imaging cameras. For more discoveries at night, and during the day.

Norfolk birding (51 Viewers)

As part of celebrating the 90th anniversary of its founding, Norfolk Wildlife Trust is asking people to share with them for all to enjoy, fond recollections of visiting one of its nature reserves.

I have known Cley Marshes for over 50 years and my fondest recollection of it was the time when birds and their habitat were the priority. In case anyone has forgotten, Sydney Long purchased the land on which the reserve stands, to be held in perpetuity as a breeding bird sanctuary.

The NWT Annual General Meeting will be held at Cley NWT on 27th October - that would seem to be a good place for someone to ask a question about the increase in non-conservation events at Cley. Even if the trustees disagree its important they know what the perception amongst some regular visitors is.
 
The NWT Annual General Meeting will be held at Cley NWT on 27th October - that would seem to be a good place for someone to ask a question about the increase in non-conservation events at Cley. Even if the trustees disagree its important they know what the perception amongst some regular visitors is.

Thank you for your suggestion, I have little doubt that the Norfolk Wildlife Trust policy makers are well aware of the level of concern over the direction Cley Marshes reserve is being driven.

No need to be a market analyst to discover the target visitor group, just read TripAdvisor.
 
Thank you for your suggestion, I have little doubt that the Norfolk Wildlife Trust policy makers are well aware of the level of concern over the direction Cley Marshes reserve is being driven.

No need to be a market analyst to discover the target visitor group, just read TripAdvisor.

I used to spend many weekends at Cley from late 70s to mid 80's (when not twitching ). The scene was vibrant centred around Nancy's and the White Horse Blakeney. But the overriding factor was the 'birding' at Cey. In those days we purchased an annual permit for *before 10am & after 5pm* only available to NNT members. The birding was good and at times brilliant. Some great characters and many friendships were made, but we were all serious birders. However things appear to have changed:-C. Many local birders ask me where to go when they visit Norfolk and obviously I say CLEY :t:.
But without exception they all return 'unimpressed '. So what's happened ? I know the breeding avocet get a bit of blame (as they do at my reserve upton warren ), but that doesn't happen all year round. So was it the flooding that wiped out the invertebrates or is it the amount of visitors. Whatever the reason it is very sad to hear the negativity. To think I would dash over most Friday nights (spring/autumn ) picking up the Leicester boys on route to have the craic and a great birding weekend.:-C
cuddy
 
Last edited:
The NWT Annual General Meeting will be held at Cley NWT on 27th October - that would seem to be a good place for someone to ask a question about the increase in non-conservation events at Cley. Even if the trustees disagree its important they know what the perception amongst some regular visitors is.

Good thinking James. I hope some people care enough to follow this up. Unfortunately the subject raised is one that has irked me for several years so I'm going to have a little rant. I suspect I know the reasoning behind it. Funding. Other national conservation bodies like the RSPB have also lost direction for me. Far too many coffee & cake days and fluffy toys and grossly over-priced goods and bird-food, and not enough useful conservation action. A look at the RSPB accounts shows a huge annual turnover but a relatively small percentage of this goes into conservation issues. I sincerely hope not but I fear the Wildlife Trusts (not just Norfolk) may be heading the same way.

It takes massive amounts of money to fund conservation as we operate it currently but I believe considerable amounts of money are spent by conservation organisations on what I perceive as 'wastes of time'. There is little point reaching out to the children of the next generation to make them into conservationists if we don't do anything NOW to protect what little we have left. Too much window-dressing and not enough viable action I believe. Money is apparently being spent on irrelevant projects when the real need is for land accumulation and on-the-ground monitoring of species diversification and numbers. I see no point in having nature reserves if we don't know what is on them and we don't know if we are protecting it adequately.

I know that times change, and that conservation costs vast amounts of money, but I wonder how effectively it is currently being done. What point erecting a hide suitable as a nuclear bunker if you have to put up fences that you can barely see through to keep away a few predators that are destroying breeding waders? It was never thus!

What point protecting a few coastal wetland reserves for (amongst other things) breeding Lapwing when virtually the whole of the county is devoid of any life due to farming practices/planning permissions, etc. Where have the inland breeding Lapwings gone? 'Nero fiddling whilst Rome burns' springs to mind.

Energies and finances are currently being directed into Cuckoos and their passage routes and wintering quarters. Fascinating, but what is being done to address the fact that the cuckoo population that once bred on our farmland is gone, leaving only riverine and coastal dune/wetland populations left? It has gone because its host species are gone, the host species are gone because the insect prey is gone. Pesticides, herbicides, neonicotinoids... all poisons being pumped into our world and nobody in our elected government is doing anything about it because they simply don't care, or at least they don't care enough to accept a loss in profits to rectify it.

The 'State of Nature 2016' report (which I urge everybody to read) is a portrayal of our dismal ineptitude and clearly shows we have failed miserably in our responsibility to our future generations to preserve the nature of the UK. Successive governments have failed us, and our conservation movements have failed to lobby those governments effectively, as have those governments failed to lobby the European Parliament adequately.

I'm wholly behind resolving the raptor persecution issues highlighted in the Hen Harrier story, but I still wonder how the financial and time-span commitment to this is effective for a species that we offer little protection to at many of its UK roost sites. I sincerely hope the Government debate over this issue goes well but I fear that too many of the people being 'briefed' will have a finger in the muddy pie of land-ownership or shoot-tenancy to actual want to change anything.

Sadly, I don't pretend to have the answers but I do feel what we're doing at present is woefully short of minimum requirements. Call me cynical if you wish but I don't see music evenings, cheese scones and jacket potatoes changing that. I fear Sydney Long and associates would not be overly impressed.
 
Nature conservation funding in the UK comes from a few sources: Agi-environment farm subsidies, national lottery, landfill tax and defra grants mostly. Defra has had its budget cut by 66%, agi-environment payments will likely dry up after 2020 due to brexit, landfill tax has been cut and lottery only pays for projects (and the odd land purchase) it won't pay for running costs or routine conservation. That leaves membership dues and fundraising to pick up the slack. Cheese scones may be the only source of funding in fifteen years.

You have a government that actively opposes conservation as "green crap" that gets in the way of making money - and a parliament who's MP's are disproportionately land-owners and farmers. Badgers, foxes and Buzzards are only the start - next up otters I suspect. And we're about to throw away 30 years of european wildlife protection legislation. And you're blaming the conservation bodies?
 
Nature conservation funding in the UK comes from a few sources: Agi-environment farm subsidies, national lottery, landfill tax and defra grants mostly. Defra has had its budget cut by 66%, agi-environment payments will likely dry up after 2020 due to brexit, landfill tax has been cut and lottery only pays for projects (and the odd land purchase) it won't pay for running costs or routine conservation. That leaves membership dues and fundraising to pick up the slack. Cheese scones may be the only source of funding in fifteen years.

You have a government that actively opposes conservation as "green crap" that gets in the way of making money - and a parliament who's MP's are disproportionately land-owners and farmers. Badgers, foxes and Buzzards are only the start - next up otters I suspect. And we're about to throw away 30 years of european wildlife protection legislation. And you're blaming the conservation bodies?

A 19th century French philosopher is attributed with making the statement "in a democracy, we get the government we deserve."

Perhaps we should now extend this statement to include the conservation charities.
 
Nature conservation funding in the UK comes from a few sources: Agi-environment farm subsidies, national lottery, landfill tax and defra grants mostly. Defra has had its budget cut by 66%, agi-environment payments will likely dry up after 2020 due to brexit, landfill tax has been cut and lottery only pays for projects (and the odd land purchase) it won't pay for running costs or routine conservation. That leaves membership dues and fundraising to pick up the slack. Cheese scones may be the only source of funding in fifteen years.

You have a government that actively opposes conservation as "green crap" that gets in the way of making money - and a parliament who's MP's are disproportionately land-owners and farmers. Badgers, foxes and Buzzards are only the start - next up otters I suspect. And we're about to throw away 30 years of european wildlife protection legislation. And you're blaming the conservation bodies?

It cannot be denied that the money made available for conservation by successive governments has seldom if ever, met the demand and conservation charities have long resorted to a variety of fund raising measures in an attempt to reduce the shortfall

I am on record as having no objection to the retail emporiums which today pass as visitor centres, making a healthy profit as long as there is clear evidence how that profit is disbursed. James Emerson has already suggested one matter that should be raised at the NWT AGM on 27th October. The viability or otherwise, of Cley Marshes Visitor Centre as a means of fund raising for conservation purposes might be another.
 
Last edited:
citrine wagtail at holme 2012 4th may just been reading some old posts and thought i would put people right i was the finder the bird was first seen at around 10:25 and i alerted kelvin and gary hibberd shortly after i dont have a pager myself so coudnt put the news out the bird left at about 12:10 and there was no other sightings to my knowledge martin
 
Good thinking James. I hope some people care enough to follow this up. Unfortunately the subject raised is one that has irked me for several years so I'm going to have a little rant. I suspect I know the reasoning behind it. Funding. Other national conservation bodies like the RSPB have also lost direction for me. Far too many coffee & cake days and fluffy toys and grossly over-priced goods and bird-food, and not enough useful conservation action. A look at the RSPB accounts shows a huge annual turnover but a relatively small percentage of this goes into conservation issues. I sincerely hope not but I fear the Wildlife Trusts (not just Norfolk) may be heading the same way.

It takes massive amounts of money to fund conservation as we operate it currently but I believe considerable amounts of money are spent by conservation organisations on what I perceive as 'wastes of time'. There is little point reaching out to the children of the next generation to make them into conservationists if we don't do anything NOW to protect what little we have left. Too much window-dressing and not enough viable action I believe. Money is apparently being spent on irrelevant projects when the real need is for land accumulation and on-the-ground monitoring of species diversification and numbers. I see no point in having nature reserves if we don't know what is on them and we don't know if we are protecting it adequately.

I know that times change, and that conservation costs vast amounts of money, but I wonder how effectively it is currently being done. What point erecting a hide suitable as a nuclear bunker if you have to put up fences that you can barely see through to keep away a few predators that are destroying breeding waders? It was never thus!

What point protecting a few coastal wetland reserves for (amongst other things) breeding Lapwing when virtually the whole of the county is devoid of any life due to farming practices/planning permissions, etc. Where have the inland breeding Lapwings gone? 'Nero fiddling whilst Rome burns' springs to mind.

Energies and finances are currently being directed into Cuckoos and their passage routes and wintering quarters. Fascinating, but what is being done to address the fact that the cuckoo population that once bred on our farmland is gone, leaving only riverine and coastal dune/wetland populations left? It has gone because its host species are gone, the host species are gone because the insect prey is gone. Pesticides, herbicides, neonicotinoids... all poisons being pumped into our world and nobody in our elected government is doing anything about it because they simply don't care, or at least they don't care enough to accept a loss in profits to rectify it.

The 'State of Nature 2016' report (which I urge everybody to read) is a portrayal of our dismal ineptitude and clearly shows we have failed miserably in our responsibility to our future generations to preserve the nature of the UK. Successive governments have failed us, and our conservation movements have failed to lobby those governments effectively, as have those governments failed to lobby the European Parliament adequately.

I'm wholly behind resolving the raptor persecution issues highlighted in the Hen Harrier story, but I still wonder how the financial and time-span commitment to this is effective for a species that we offer little protection to at many of its UK roost sites. I sincerely hope the Government debate over this issue goes well but I fear that too many of the people being 'briefed' will have a finger in the muddy pie of land-ownership or shoot-tenancy to actual want to change anything.

Sadly, I don't pretend to have the answers but I do feel what we're doing at present is woefully short of minimum requirements. Call me cynical if you wish but I don't see music evenings, cheese scones and jacket potatoes changing that. I fear Sydney Long and associates would not be overly impressed.
Brilliantly put my friend
 
Titchwell October 5th

Today's highlights

Yellow browed warbler - 2 mobile birds around the carpark/Meadow Trail + 1 in Willow Wood
Redstart - female at Thornham Point
Pectoral sandpiper - 1 still present on fresh marsh
Little stint - 2 on fresh marsh
Curlew sandpiper - 1 on fresh marsh
Jack snipe - 1 on fresh marsh
Yellow legged gull - adult on fresh marsh

Paul
 
It's looking absolutely seismic this weekend, can anybody remember such a good chart? I had planned on coming back next weekend, but I have suddenly found myself seeing friends and relatives in the fine county this weekend. Could it be a repeat of '75? Or even '94 for us younger viewers? Best of luck guys and girls, it promises to be a very interesting weekend indeed...
 
It's looking absolutely seismic this weekend, can anybody remember such a good chart? I had planned on coming back next weekend, but I have suddenly found myself seeing friends and relatives in the fine county this weekend. Could it be a repeat of '75? Or even '94 for us younger viewers? Best of luck guys and girls, it promises to be a very interesting weekend indeed...

What did those two weather patterns produce out of interest?
 
Holkham 1975: Yellow browed bunting, black throated thrush, OBP, Izzy shrike, multiple yb, pallas's, radde's and Dusky warbler. Perhaps more... Here's hoping for a repeat!
 
Titchwell October 7th

Today's highlights

Red breasted flycatcher - 1 again in scrub between visitor centre and carpark but elusive
Yellow browed warbler - at least 4 birds in Meadow Trail/carpark area
Pectoral sandpiper - 1 still on fresh marsh
Curlew sandpiper - 3 on Volunteer Marsh
Little stint - 3 on fresh marsh
Jack snipe - 1 on fresh marsh
Snow bunting - 1 on beach this morning
Pied flycatcher - 1 in trees by visitor centre this afternoon
Slavonian grebe - 1 offshore
Redstart - 1 in hedge on East Trail
Short eared owl - 2 in/off sea late afternoon

Paul
 
Well, the weather paid off today. Kieran, Ian and I located a second rbf fly at Warham at lunchtime, whilst Stiffkey produced a minimum of 3 yb warbler and an interesting call that sadly we were unable to follow up on. Overnight rain and more easterlies could make for another good days birding tomorrow...
 
Titchwell October 8th

Today's highlights

Red breasted flycatcher - 1 still present but mobile and very elusive
Yellow browed warbler - at least 4 birds still present
Pied flycatcher - 2 around Meadow Trail/carpark area
Redstart - 1 on East Trail
Jack snipe - 2 on fresh marsh, 1 on Patsy's reedbed, 1 in reedbed
Pectoral sandpiper - 1 still on fresh marsh
Little stint - 3 on fresh marsh
Curlew sandpiper - 1 on fresh marsh
Ring ouzel - at least 1 on East Trail

Paul
 
Hi all,

I'm thinking of paying a visit to Norfolk in order to try for the Radde's Warbler at Holkham and I was wondering if anyone could fill me in on how easy it might be actually to see it. RBA reports are only being sent out a few times a day and are saying that it's generally rather elusive. I was just wondering if it is generally about but hard to see or is there generally no sign of it and it's just showing a few times a day?

Also, is the location fairly straight-forward to find? i.e. if I walk about 250 yards west of the cross roads will it be obvious when I've got to the spot?

TIA


Adam
 
Titchwell October 10th

Today's highlights

Red breasted flycatcher - 1 still present but very elusive. Seen several times on access road during the day
Great white egret - 1 feeding in saltmarsh channels mid morning
Yellow browed warbler - at least 3 still present on site
Redstart - 1 still on East Trail
Ring ouzel - 2 males on reserve
Pectoral sandpiper - juv on fresh marsh
Jack snipe - 2 on fresh marsh just north of Island Hide
Little stint - 3 on fresh marsh
Curlew sandpiper - 2 on fresh marsh
Red kite - 1 west
Spoonbill - 2 on fresh marsh
Reed warbler - late bird along main path
Pied flycatcher - at least 1 bird still present

Paul

Paul
 
Titchwell October 11th

Today's highlights

Yellow browed warbler - at least 5 around the reserve
Curlew sandpiper - 3 on fresh marsh
Little stint - 2 on fresh marsh
Jack snipe - 2 on fresh marsh
Spoonbill - 2 on fresh marsh
Ruff - 60 on Patsy's reedbed

Paul
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Back
Top