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Passeriformes (1 Viewer)

TomDerutter

Well-known member
But see this thread:
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
But see this thread:
Ah ! Bah, it's possible 🤷
 

Acanthis

Well-known member

July 3​

This is part 2 of the suboscine revisions (3 to go). All of today's changes are part of the project to incorporate Harvey et al. (2020) into the TiF list. Today focuses on the first part of Tyrannida — all but the tyrant flycatchers, Tyrannidae. Although the family tree has changed a bit, the only change to the linear order of the Tyrannida families is to move Tityridae before Oxyruncidae. We now turn to the individual families. Many genera have been internally reordered. For the most part, I won't mention those changes. What I do mention are species splits and changes at or above the generic level.

What do the stars mean? You'll notice stars on the species trees in this section. If you look closely, there is only one star per genus. It denotes the type species of that genus. I found this handy for deciding how to delimit genera, and decided to keep it. Expect these to show up on more of the pdf lists in the future.

Manakins: The Serra do Mar Tyrant-Manakin, Neopelma chrysolophum, is not closely related the other Neopelma. An alternate genus name is not available and I designate it "Neopelma" until one is available. The change in the tree has allowed me to return to a narrow Tyranneutes and a broad Neopelma. Also, Chloropipo has been repositioned. Other genera have not been affected, other than some internal reordering.
[Pipridae, Tyrannida I, 3.03]

Cotingas: The clade Gymnoderini, previously considered sister to Cotinga is now on an independent branch. This lead to some generic shuffling in the subfamily Cotinginae. Also, Phibalura has switched places with Phytotoma. Again, there has been some reordering with the genera.

Capuchinbird: The Capuchinbird, Cephalopterus tricolor, repositioned in the tree. This allows me to return it to the monotypic genus Perissocephalus. Although the genetic distance between the Capuchinbird and umbrella-birds is small, they are distintive, justifying a separate genus.
[Cotingidae, Tyrannida I, 3.03]

Schiffornis, Tityras, and Becards: There are no changes at the generic level, but some genera have had internal reordering.
[Tityridae, Tyrannida I, 3.03]

Royal Flycatchers: Whether the Royal Flycatcher, Onychorhynchus coronatus, is one species or four has long been disputed. Harvey et al. (2020) sampled one each of all four of them. The closest pair of taxo, mexicanus and occidentalis, have been separated for about a million years. In view of this, I think it makes sense to recognize four species in the complex.
  • Atlantic Royal Flycatcher, Onychorhynchus swainsoni
  • Amazonian Royal Flycatcher, Onychorhynchus coronatus
  • Northern Royal Flycatcher, Onychorhynchus mexicanus
  • Pacific Royal Flycatcher, Onychorhynchus occidentalis
[Onychorhynchidae, Tyrannida I, 3.03]

Mionectine Flycatchers and allies: The most obvious changes on the tree are at the generic level. Ceratotriccus has moved to a new place on the tree, sister to Poecilotriccus. Needless to say, this involved a change in membership for Ceratotriccus.

Idoptilon and Microcochlearius have disappeared into an expanded Oncostoma and Hemitriccus, respectively. In exchange, we added Perissotriccus (2 species removed from Myiornis) and Euscarthmornis (4 species that were in Ceratotriccus in the previous list).

Pipromorphinae — Mionectine flycatchers: Based on Harvey et al. (2020), I've moved the Serra do Mar Tyrannulet, Phylloscartes difficilis, and Sao Paulo Tyrannulet, Phylloscartes paulista, to genus Pogonotriccus.

There are also some splits in the Mionectine flycatchers. The following are based on Harvey et al. (2020), usually with the assistance of the HBW Checklist (i.e., del Hoyo and Collar, 2016).

The Slaty-capped Flycatcher, Leptopogon superciliaris has been split into
  • Western Slaty-capped Flycatcher, Leptopogon tranandinus, including hellmaryi, and if needed, troglodytes for the Darien population.
  • Eastern Slaty-capped Flycatcher, Leptopogon superciliaris
  • White-bellied Flycatcher, Leptopogon albidiventer
Although eBird recognizes L. tranandinus as a species group. They did not give it an English name, so I have given it and L. superciliaris temporary English names. Harvey et al. (2020) tested hellmayri and found it 2 million years distant from L. albidiventer, and more like 3 million from L. s. superciliaris (sensu stricto, from Loreto, Peru). I wouldn't have to write this way if they hadn't lumped many of the subspecies.

The Olive-striped Flycatcher, Mionectes olivaceus has been split into
  • Olive-streaked Flycatcher, Mionectes olivaceus
  • Western Olive-striped Flycatcher, Mionectes galbinus
  • Eastern Olive-striped Flycatcher, Mionectes venezuelensis
The English names are from the HBW Checklist (volume 2, del Hoyo and Collar, 2016).

Finally, the Junin Flycatcher, Pipromorpha peruana has been split from McConnell's Flycatcher, Pipromorpha macconnelli.

[Pipromorphinae, Tyrannida I, 3.03]

Rhynchocyclinae — Flatbills Everyone knows Tolmomyias is a mess. Harvey et al. (2020) sampled some of them, but I'm not ready for a full reorganization. I do recognize two splits based on Harvey et al. (2020), and the IOC and HBW Checklists.
  • The Yellow-margined Flycatcher / Yellow-margined Flatbill, Tolmomyias assimilisis split into
    1. Yellow-winged Flycatcher / Yellow-margined Flatbill, Tolmomyias flavotectus (monotypic)
    2. Zimmer's Flatbill, Tolmomyias assimilis.
    This separates the most divergent known Tolmomyias (flavotectus) as a separate species.
  • The Yellow-breasted Flycatcher, Tolmomyias flaviventrisis split into
    1. Ochre-lored Flatbill, Tolmomyias flaviventris, including aurulentus and dissors
    2. Olive-faced Flatbill, Tolmomyias viridiceps, including subsimilis and zimmeri.
Well, Tolmomyias is still a mess, but perhaps slightly less so. For one, the position of T. sulphurescens on the tree represents the nominate subspecies. They don't all belong there. At the very least, T.s. cinericeps, sometimes called Gray-headed Flatbill, is sister to Gray-crowned Flatbill, Tolmomyias poliocephalus. I don't have any idea whether other subspecies group with it or not, so I'm not splitting it at this time.
[Rhynchocyclinae, Tyrannida I, 3.03]

Triccinae — Genus Changes: A number of genera in the Triccinae subfamily have been realigned based on Harvey et al. (2020). Here is a summary:
  1. Two species have moved from Poecilotriccus to Ceratotriccus.
    • Black-and-white Tody-Flycatcher (Ceratotriccus capitalis
    • White-cheeked Tody-Flycatcher (Ceratotriccus albifacies
  2. The Boat-billed Tody-Tyrant, Microcochlearius josephinae, has been returned to Hemitriccus.
  3. The following have been transferred back to Hemitriccus from Ceratotriccus:
    • Buff-throated Tody-Tyrant, Ceratotriccus rufigularis,
    • Black-throated Tody-Tyrant, Ceratotriccus granadensis,
    • Cinnamon-breasted Tody-Tyrant, Ceratotriccus cinnamomeipectus,
    • Kaempfer's Tody-Tyrant, Ceratotriccus kaempferi,
    • Eye-ringed Tody-Tyrant, Ceratotriccus orbitatus,
    • Buff-breasted Tody-Tyrant, Ceratotriccus mirandae.
  4. The following have been transferred to Euscarthmornis from Ceratotriccus:
    • Pearly-vented Tody-Tyrant, Ceratotriccus margaritaceiventer,
    • Hangnest Tody-Tyrant, Ceratotriccus nidipendulus,
    • Stripe-necked Tody-Tyrant, Ceratotriccus striaticollis,
    • Johannes's Tody-Tyrant, Ceratotriccus iohannis.
  5. Two species have been transferred to Perissotriccus from Myiornis:
    • Black-capped Pygmy-Tyrant, Myiornis atricapillus,
    • Short-tailed Pygmy-Tyrant, Myiornis ecaudatus.
  6. Two species have been transferred to Myiornis from Ceratotriccus:
    • Zimmer's Tody-Tyrant, Ceratotriccus minimus,
    • Pelzeln's Tody-Tyrant, Ceratotriccus inornatus.
  7. Three species have been transferred to Oncostoma from Idioptilon and Poecilotriccus:
    • Buff-cheeked Tody-Flycatcher, Poecilotriccus senex,
    • White-eyed Tody-Tyrant, Idioptilon zosterops,
    • White-bellied Tody-Tyrant, Idioptilon griseipectum.
There was substantial genetic distance (almost 3 million years) in the various Eared Pygmy-Tyrants, Myiornis auricularis, and White-bellied Pygmy-Tyrants, Myiornis albiventris tested by Harvey et al. (2020). Further, albiventris was nested within the auricularis clade. I've not made any changes based on this.

[Triccinae, Tyrannida I, 3.03]

Arguing the case for some of the little guys, I would suggest a Tribe or Subfamily-level split for the distinct Purpletufts (Iodopleura sp.).
There is an available name: "Iodopleuridae, Bonaparte 1854"

A fairly old division within Tityridae (though not as early as the Mourners) in Harvey et al, and in an earlier paper which I can't for the life of me find at the moment.
Distinctive morphology, feeding habits and unique spectacular display feathers separate them from the other Tityrine genera.

On a more subjective level they seem to fade into the background in the various Lynx edicions books I have to hand, even in 'The Largest Avian Radiation' where the illustrated individual is inflated to a size similar to the rest of the family's examples.
 
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Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
Arguing the case for some of the little guys, I would suggest a Tribe or Subfamily-level split for the distinct Purpletufts (Iodopleura sp.).
There is an available name: "Iodopleuridae, Bonaparte 1854"

A fairly old division within Tityridae (though not as early as the Mourners) in Harvey et al, and in an earlier paper which I can't for the life of me find at the moment.
Distinctive morphology, feeding habits and unique spectacular display feathers separate them from the other Tityrine genera.

On a more subjective level they seem to fade into the background in the various Lynx edicions books I have to hand, even in 'The Largest Avian Radiation' where the illustrated individual has been inflated to a similar size as the rest of the family's examples.
In another vein, several years ago, I divided Piprites into two genera: Piprites and Hemipipo. Harvey & al show a great divergence between the 3 species
 

TomDerutter

Well-known member
Grallariidae has some old divergences.
2 subfamilies:
Myrmotherinae MacGillivray,1839:
Cryptopezus, Grallaricula
, Hylopezus, and Myrmothera

Grallariinae:
Grallarius

Grallarius
itself should likely be carved up, the split between the varia group and the rest is older then divergence times within Myrmotherinae.

varia group keeps the name Grallarius (Vieillot, 1816)
(squamigera, gigantea, excelsa, griseonucha, haplonota, alleni, guatimalensis, chthonia, varia)

the others fall apart in two groups:

rufula group:
Oropezus Ridgway 1909
(andicolus, spatiator, saltuensis, rufocinerea, alvarezi, rufula, blakei, gravesi, oneilli, obscura, centralis, ayacuchensis, occabambae, sinaensis, cochabambae)

andicolus
seems especially distinct from the others in this group. Needs a new genus?


ruficapilla group:
Hypsibemon Cabanis 1847
(dignissima, eludens, ridgelyi, nuchalis, carrikeri, albigula, ruficapilla, watkinsi, flavotincta, urraoensis, milleri, kaestneri, bangsi, quitensis, hypoleuca, przewalskii, capitalis, erythroleuca, erythrotis)
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
Grallariidae has some old divergences.
2 subfamilies:
Myrmotherinae MacGillivray,1839:
Cryptopezus, Grallaricula
, Hylopezus, and Myrmothera

Grallariinae:
Grallarius

Grallarius
itself should likely be carved up, the split between the varia group and the rest is older then divergence times within Myrmotherinae.

varia group keeps the name Grallarius (Vieillot, 1816)
(squamigera, gigantea, excelsa, griseonucha, haplonota, alleni, guatimalensis, chthonia, varia)

the others fall apart in two groups:

rufula group:
Oropezus Ridgway 1909
(andicolus, spatiator, saltuensis, rufocinerea, alvarezi, rufula, blakei, gravesi, oneilli, obscura, centralis, ayacuchensis, occabambae, sinaensis, cochabambae)

andicolus
seems especially distinct from the others in this group. Needs a new genus?


ruficapilla group:
Hypsibemon Cabanis 1847
(dignissima, eludens, ridgelyi, nuchalis, carrikeri, albigula, ruficapilla, watkinsi, flavotincta, urraoensis, milleri, kaestneri, bangsi, quitensis, hypoleuca, przewalskii, capitalis, erythroleuca, erythrotis)
Grallaria, not Grallarius 😉
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
In another vein, several years ago, I divided Piprites into two genera: Piprites and Hemipipo. Harvey & al show a great divergence between the 3 species

Piprites: The Black-capped Piprites is only very distantly related to the other two Piprites. Harvey et al. (2020) estimate that their common ancestor lived over 18.5 mya. Because of this, the other two Pipirtes (sic) have been placed in the genus Hemipipo (Cabanis, 1847), type chloris.
[Pipritidae, Tyrannida I, 3.04]


I'm genialissimous and I'm a genius
 

Acanthis

Well-known member
Since we are focused on the Tyrannida it is interesting to note that in "The Largest Avian Radiation" 's revised classification the group (Parvorder) is divided between three superfamilies: Piproidea, Cotingoidea, and Tyrannoidea.

Also within their Tyrannoidea as shown in fig.5.2 there is a division between Tyrannidae, Platyrhinchidae, Rhynchocyclidae, Tachurisidae and Pipritidae on one hand, and Tityridae, Onychorhynchidae and Oxyruncidae on the other.
One could argue for the creation of a 'Tityroidea' for the last three families.

Just spitballing ideas😁
 

jts1882

Well-known member
United Kingdom
Cracraft's classification in H&M4 had Tityroidea as one of four superfamilies. Including it in an expanded Tyrannoidea would be one way of accommodating its paraphyly in Oliveros et al (2019), Feng et al (2020) and most analyses in Harvey et al (2020). But it seems odd for The Largest Avian Radiation to take that approach if Titroidea is monophyletic in Fig 5.2.
 

Acanthis

Well-known member
Cracraft's classification in H&M4 had Tityroidea as one of four superfamilies. Including it in an expanded Tyrannoidea would be one way of accommodating its paraphyly in Oliveros et al (2019), Feng et al (2020) and most analyses in Harvey et al (2020). But it seems odd for The Largest Avian Radiation to take that approach if Titroidea is monophyletic in Fig 5.2.
The authors are content to have them "...as the sister group to the massive radiation that includes all the flatbills and tody-tyrants....and typical New World Flycatchers".
"...it brings together in one monophyletic clade all the groups which, in contrast to the fruit-eating Pipridae and Cotingidae, include in their diet a substantial amount of animal prey".
 

TomDerutter

Well-known member

July 13​


This is part 3 of the ongoing suboscine revisions (2 to go). There are quite a few splits this time (26). Almost all of these involve adding (1) existing splits or subspecies groups from the HBW Checklists that are (2) supported by Harvey et al. (2020). By this I usually mean that Harvey et al. found roughly 2 million years divergence or more.

(long update...)
 

pbjosh

missing the neotropics
Switzerland

July 13​


This is part 3 of the ongoing suboscine revisions (2 to go). There are quite a few splits this time (26). Almost all of these involve adding (1) existing splits or subspecies groups from the HBW Checklists that are (2) supported by Harvey et al. (2020). By this I usually mean that Harvey et al. found roughly 2 million years divergence or more.

(long update...)

Anyone know more about this comment, under Streaked Flycatcher Myiodynastes maculatus?

"PS. Still waiting for the Island Streaked-Flycatcher to be described…"
 

Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
Gray-capped Tyrannulet: The Gray-capped Tyrannulet, formerly Phyllomyias griseocapilla, has been transferred to Zimmerius.
No please, no, nooooo

Please Boyd, if you are reading this thread, put "Phyllomyias" griseocapilla in quotes please
 
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Jim LeNomenclatoriste

Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
France
Would you mind commenting more on this issue? I noticed that too but I've just read the updates and haven't thought about it yet / haven't looked at Harvey again.
Even though Phyllomyias griseocapilla is basal and sister to all Zimmerius, isn't it different enough to be placed in a distinct genus?
 

cajanuma

Well-known member
Anyone know more about this comment, under Streaked Flycatcher Myiodynastes maculatus?

"PS. Still waiting for the Island Streaked-Flycatcher to be described…"
I think this is something Bret Whitney and others are working on, apparently the population of 'Streaked' Flycatcher that occurs on Amazonian river islands is an undescribed, species-level taxon (by voice, I would guess). It's mentioned in several Field Guides trip reports that Bret Whitney has led.
 

pbjosh

missing the neotropics
Switzerland
I think this is something Bret Whitney and others are working on, apparently the population of 'Streaked' Flycatcher that occurs on Amazonian river islands is an undescribed, species-level taxon (by voice, I would guess). It's mentioned in several Field Guides trip reports that Bret Whitney has led.

Thanks! I don't think I'd seen this info before. BTW I'm currently planning a lengthy trip to W/SW Brazilian Amazonia with a couple friends. Still bummed I missed going w/ you and Lieven, but appreciating your excellent trip report!
 

Acanthis

Well-known member

July 13​


This is part 3 of the ongoing suboscine revisions (2 to go). There are quite a few splits this time (26). Almost all of these involve adding (1) existing splits or subspecies groups from the HBW Checklists that are (2) supported by Harvey et al. (2020). By this I usually mean that Harvey et al. found roughly 2 million years divergence or more.

(long update...)
Brilliant!
Loving this and looking forward to the next two updates.
 
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia
ZEISS. Discover the fascinating world of birds, and win a birding trip to Columbia

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