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From my Manhattan Window (1 Viewer)

Baglee

Member
Dragonflies

After racking up a reasonable 8 species in Bryant Park, and then adding to that on a walk back down the Hudson on the west side, this morning's items of interest from the window included Blue Jay, Mourning Dove and Chimney Swift. Of greater interest (possibly) is what appears to be a significant passage of dragonflies throughout Manhattan (at least 10 in Bryant, several dozen along the Hudson, and then 6 or more along West 12th). I assume this to be annual - but thought it worthy of mention.
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello Baglee,

Good birds! I have never seen a chimney swift in New York City.

Happy bird watching,
Arthur Pinewood :hi:
 

etudiant

Registered User
Supporter
Hello Baglee,

Good birds! I have never seen a chimney swift in New York City.

Happy bird watching,
Arthur Pinewood :hi:

Hey Arthur, don't go discouraging the visiting birders!
Chimney Swifts are routinely seen in Manhattan, particularly Central Park's North End.
They hunt along the edge of the North Woods just after the grass ball fields.
Yesterday some were whistling between the trees on Great Hill, no more than 30 feet off the ground, looked stuffed, with their chin bulging out.
 

Baglee

Member
Flurry of activity

Today saw 'unprecedented' levels of activity on 12th... a Blue Jay across the street, and American Robin commuting between 11th and 13th. A circling Double Crested Cormorant threw me for a few moments, and two Chimney Swift made their way past - also at height. A Mourning Dove took a sentry position across the way on a water tower. On the fringes, a Common Grackle was at the western end of 11th street - quite vocal. And, late news from Washington Square yesterday, when there was a delightful showing of what I suspect were fireflies.
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Today saw 'unprecedented' levels of activity on 12th... a Blue Jay across the street, and American Robin commuting between 11th and 13th. A circling Double Crested Cormorant threw me for a few moments, and two Chimney Swift made their way past - also at height. A Mourning Dove took a sentry position across the way on a water tower. On the fringes, a Common Grackle was at the western end of 11th street - quite vocal. And, late news from Washington Square yesterday, when there was a delightful showing of what I suspect were fireflies.

Hello Baglee,

Quite a good day, indeed.

Fireflies have yet to reach my window, but they are anticipated.

Happy bird watching,
Arthur
 

Baglee

Member
Sharp-shinned Hawk: 12th Street

Arthur. Be interested to get your take on this; I'm fairly sure I had views of a young Sharp-shinned Hawk across the end of 12th Street yesterday evening. Sadly I was without binoculars, but the bird was just above rooftop level, and heading south toward Washington Square. I imagine the only other potential candidate for the bird's identity (Cooper's) is a less common sight here. Anyway - any thoughts gratefully received. Other species yesterday: Double-crested Cormorant, Blue Jay, Mourning Dove.
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Arthur. Be interested to get your take on this; I'm fairly sure I had views of a young Sharp-shinned Hawk across the end of 12th Street yesterday evening. Sadly I was without binoculars, but the bird was just above rooftop level, and heading south toward Washington Square. I imagine the only other potential candidate for the bird's identity (Cooper's) is a less common sight here. Anyway - any thoughts gratefully received. Other species yesterday: Double-crested Cormorant, Blue Jay, Mourning Dove.

Hello Baglee,

I think that the Cooper's hawk may be just as likely. Incidentally, American kestrels turn up on the Lower East Side, China Town and on the Upper West Side, where they have been known to nest.

Happy bird watching,
Arthur :hi:
 

Baglee

Member
Red-tailed Hawks

Dear Arthur, just (09.40) had three Red-tailed Hawk rising form the area of Washington Park, then circling and heading north west (broadly speaking). That's the largest group I've seen in Manhattan, let alone down here in the Village. Good birding, Patrick
 

rogero36

New member
the white troated sparrow

a gray catbird[/URL] and a white throated sparrow. Recently, last week, I spotted a hermit thrush and quite likely a wood thrush. I also saw a northern flicker on the ground, outside. The northern flicker frequently forages on the ground, which confused me, when I first saw one. Without the help of another bird watcher, I would not have realised that it was woodpecker.



Happy bird watching,
Arthur Pinewood

HI
i have never seen a white throated sparrow,do they arrive in flocks,
like sparrows in uk , live in familys, and stay all year round,
regards blackdog
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Dear Arthur, just (09.40) had three Red-tailed Hawk rising form the area of Washington Park, then circling and heading north west (broadly speaking). That's the largest group I've seen in Manhattan, let alone down here in the Village. Good birding, Patrick

Hello Patrick,

Were any red tailed hawks juveniles?

Happy bird watching,
Arthur :hi:
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
HI
i have never seen a white throated sparrow,do they arrive in flocks,
like sparrows in uk , live in familys, and stay all year round,
regards blackdog

Hello RogerO,

The white throated sparrows arrive in the autumn, fall as the locals call it, and stay for the winter. They usually appear in groups but I cannot say if they flock.
BTW the house sparrow is a relatively recent import from the Uk, they have been around for around 140 years. Before they became ubiquitous in American cities, they were known as English sparrows.

Happy bird watching,
Arthur :hi:
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello,

I have been visited, twice, by a juvenile northern cardinal. They show an extraordinary brownish red hue.

Happy bird watching,
Arthur :hi:
 

Baglee

Member
Eyes on the skies

Arthur, and other occasional Manhattan Window readers. This afternoon saw a fairly good (or exceptionally good depending on previous records) passage of Broad-winged hawks moving south over Central Park. I had one group of 88 birds, and I know that counts have been in the several hundreds. If north winds continue overnight and conditions stay favourable, you might well get a few continuing the movement tomorrow. One or two Sharp-shinned involved too. And good numbers of Chimney swift and Monarch. Very best, Patrick
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Arthur, and other occasional Manhattan Window readers. This afternoon saw a fairly good (or exceptionally good depending on previous records) passage of Broad-winged hawks moving south over Central Park. I had one group of 88 birds, and I know that counts have been in the several hundreds. If north winds continue overnight and conditions stay favourable, you might well get a few continuing the movement tomorrow. One or two Sharp-shinned involved too. And good numbers of Chimney swift and Monarch. Very best, Patrick

Patrick,

Good news.

Happy bird watching,
Arthur
 

Baglee

Member
Cedar Waxwings

Arthur. Just this moment had 6 Cedar Waxwing heading south over 12th Street at a rate of knots. If this weather is blocking movement further north, might be interesting to see what arrives on Wednesday or even Thursday.
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Arthur. Just this moment had 6 Cedar Waxwing heading south over 12th Street at a rate of knots. If this weather is blocking movement further north, might be interesting to see what arrives on Wednesday or even Thursday.

Hello,

Raining and blowing, all day. A change is in the air.

Arthur
 

Pinewood

New York correspondent
United States
Hello,

Tuesday, I spotted a northern flicker from my window. Yesterday, a warbler turned up, dead on the ground, which looked like a blackburnian, but i could not be sure.

Some years, ago, a northern flicker flew into my closed window, frightening me, then flew off.

Happy bird watching,
Arthur :hi:
 

Baglee

Member
Black-and-white warbler on 12th St and 5th

After the heavy rain, an unexpected bonus: a Black-and-white warbler working its way through the tree opposite our window. Perhaps other stragglers are also seeking refuge in unlikely spots?
 

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