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IOC combines forces w/ NACC, SACC, Cornell, and more to produce "global checklist" (1 Viewer)

dantheman

Bah humbug
I'm agreeing with a lot that is being said here. But I think a fair few people know a handful more dinosaur names (maybe not the full binomial admittedly) - Diplodocus, Stegasaurus, Velociraptor, Pteradactyl etc, depending on how recently they watched those documentaries about a dinosaur theme park ... ;)
 

etudiant

Registered User
Supporter
I'm agreeing with a lot that is being said here. But I think a fair few people know a handful more dinosaur names (maybe not the full binomial admittedly) - Diplodocus, Stegasaurus, Velociraptor, Pteradactyl etc, depending on how recently they watched those documentaries about a dinosaur theme park ... ;)

That's simply because we don't usually run across them, else we'd have proper names for them.
It might be worth starting a contest for plausible popular names for the better known dinosaurs. We surely deserve better than a bunch of .....saurus appelations.
 

dantheman

Bah humbug
That's simply because we don't usually run across them, else we'd have proper names for them.
It might be worth starting a contest for plausible popular names for the better known dinosaurs. We surely deserve better than a bunch of .....saurus appelations.

Probably a good thing ... or not. Help solve some other of the world's problems.

Renaming - agree - probably should have it's own thread though ...
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
That's simply because we don't usually run across them, else we'd have proper names for them.
It might be worth starting a contest for plausible popular names for the better known dinosaurs. We surely deserve better than a bunch of .....saurus appelations.

Toothy McToothface? Great Big B****** Lizard?

No.....!

I was birding on Shetland a couple of years ago and a Greenish Warbler found its way to a community woodland whose winding footpath was hosting a fibreglass dinosaur exhibition.

"Directions please"

(Hushed tones) "It's just to the left of the Tyrannosaur's head" - the urge to add "now run!" had to be resisted....

Lets stick with what we've got on this! :t:

John
 

Mysticete

Well-known member
United States
I'll bet that the average person knows about three Dinosaurs, most would be pushed to go beyond Brontosaurus, Tricerotops and T-rex so that's not really a valid comparison.

The average person knows only very small number of birds by common names, most of which are things in there yard or area (And they are likely to use completely incorrect names for some of those they do know...see any heron-like bird in parts of my country called a "crane"). So I am not certain this is a good comparison

There is a subculture of paleo folks and amateur collectors who know a lot of latin names. Latin taxonomy is also much more accepted in a lot of other hobbyist groups to various extents, from fish-keeping to shell-collecting. And many of these hobbyist groups do not lose sleep over the idea that multiple common names exist for critters. Even hobbies that are far more impacted by this (seriously...it gets damn confusing going to a petstore and sometimes figuring out whats in tank, because they are using some defunct trade name from 20 years versus the current popular name). For whatever historical quirks, birders double-downed on common names and now obsess over them to a far greater degree than practically any other relevant naturalist hobby.
 
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Kirk Roth

Well-known member
The average person knows only very small number of birds by common names, most of which are things in there yard or area (And they are likely to use completely incorrect names for some of those they do know...see any heron-like bird in parts of my country called a "crane"). So I am not certain this is a good comparison

There is a subculture of paleo folks and amateur collectors who know a lot of latin names. Latin taxonomy is also much more accepted in a lot of other hobbyist groups to various extents, from fish-keeping to shell-collecting. And many of these hobbyist groups do not lose sleep over the idea that multiple common names exist for critters. Even hobbies that are far more impacted by this (seriously...it gets damn confusing going to a petstore and sometimes figuring out whats in tank, because they are using some defunct trade name from 20 years versus the current popular name). For whatever historical quirks, birders double-downed on common names and now obsess over them to a far greater degree than practically any other relevant naturalist hobby.

We were talking about Creationists, not really birders, regarding the Latin names of dinosaurs. I can attest that indeed a great many of the more fervent Creationists I've heard from do have a passing familiarity with dinosaur names and that there is a whole new level of frustration experienced listening to someone "explain" how Archaeopteryx fossils are "faked."

But the topic has moved to birders, which have a whole different motivation in naming. I might argue that understanding taxonomy does make one a better birder (e.g. understanding why Apodiformes don't perch on wires like swallows, etc. etc. etc.) but agree that to many birdwatchers it is not a necessary skill.
 

Mysticete

Well-known member
United States
We were talking about Creationists, not really birders, regarding the Latin names of dinosaurs. I can attest that indeed a great many of the more fervent Creationists I've heard from do have a passing familiarity with dinosaur names and that there is a whole new level of frustration experienced listening to someone "explain" how Archaeopteryx fossils are "faked."

But the topic has moved to birders, which have a whole different motivation in naming. I might argue that understanding taxonomy does make one a better birder (e.g. understanding why Apodiformes don't perch on wires like swallows, etc. etc. etc.) but agree that to many birdwatchers it is not a necessary skill.

Personally I agree...knowing that vireos and New World warblers are very different unrelated groups of birds helped me as an early birder sort of key in on the subtle differences in form and behavior that distinguish the two.
 

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