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Keep your cat inside during spring (1 Viewer)

Sangahyando

Well-known member
Not sure there even is a good candidate for such a disease currently, although the miracles of genetic engineering may allow one to be created.
But then you'll have to worry about the disease getting out of the country, and infecting wild animals overseas.
 

etudiant

Registered User
Supporter
But then you'll have to worry about the disease getting out of the country, and infecting wild animals overseas.

Absolutely true, biological weapons are inherently unpredictable, plus there is always some prospect of the disease mutating to infect other species.
The main protection would be the relative isolation of Australia and the absence of closely related species, both offer some reassurance, but there is risk. That must be weighted against the ongoing ecocide taking place due to the unchecked feral cat population.
 

CalvinFold

Registered User
Supporter
The choice is very simple: cats or wildlife, no whining or thumb-sucking.
Pretty much. I've heard far more benefits to keeping them indoors or not having them at all (if you think indoor-only is cruel) than letting them be outside.
 

CalvinFold

Registered User
Supporter
Change the Humans First: Principles for Improving the Management of Free-Roaming Cats, free full-text, open access
I admit I skimmed, and it was kinda odd when every time I stopped to deep-read, it was repeating the same concept. Are all research papers like this? |:S|

In any case, did I miss something or did this paper not actually tackle the problem of feral cats head-on, but just cover the basics of how to change human behavior? Seemed like the "cat" part was just painted-onto a human behavioral study.

I say "basics" mostly because every time I stopped to read I didn't see much that would surprise, say, a trained marketing person for a consumer packaged goods company.

"The only way to get cat people to stop their cats from destroying ecosystems is to get cat people to change their behavior. Here are some ideas how to figure that out."

I don't mean to be dismissive Samandag, and am curious what your point was. I perhaps missed the point skimming due to lack of time and the yawn-inducing verbosity and repetitiveness of the author.
 

John Cantelo

Well-known member
I've never been able to understand the mentality of people who think it's OK to release cats to wander into their neighbours' gardens whether or not they may like it. To me, it seems inconsiderate and selfish. Society does not tolerate any other domesticated animal having such freedom.
 

SteveTS

Well-known member
I don't mean to be dismissive Samandag, and am curious what your point was. I perhaps missed the point skimming due to lack of time and the yawn-inducing verbosity and repetitiveness of the author.

Simply adding new material to keep Andy's thread in the news, so to speak, and in the case of this paper just the messenger. Some of the 'research' based efforts in cat control are of interest to some people and not to those who maintain a more active approach.
 

SteveTS

Well-known member
I've never been able to understand the mentality of people who think it's OK to release cats to wander into their neighbours' gardens whether or not they may like it. To me, it seems inconsiderate and selfish. Society does not tolerate any other domesticated animal having such freedom.

Agreed, and wholeheartedly.

More people need to be asking more questions of cat owners and cat lovers; more challenging questions and more often.

If your local 'cat rescue' is caring for 300 - 400 cats, and this is not uncommon, why on earth would they??
 

SteveTS

Well-known member
Back in Australia the NSW Environmental Trust have this month awarded the University of New England AU$14.6 million to tackle the devastating impact feral cats are having on New South Wales wildlife:

NSW Feral Cat Project
 

Foxy

Well-known member
It is estimated that cats kill 30,000,000 birds per year. That sounds like a staggering, unbelievable statistic. But there are approximately 16,000,000 domesticated cats in the UK. If only half of them are allowed to roam outside that's 8,000,000 and if each only kills 4 birds a year....QED. I suspect it is a conservative figure.
The BBC reporter who analysed the statistic finished off the report with a comment that it can't be doing any harm as the bird population is surviving. Really?
 

Foxy

Well-known member
....and the double standards of cat owners is incredible. To illustrate. I had two rabbits roaming free in my garden. Because my neighbour refuses to repair his broken fence one of them discovered a way into his garden where it would sit soaking up the sun. Presumably for a rabbit the sun was better in his garden than mine. He - the neighbour - asked me to stop him doing that as he was pooing on his lawn so I sorted out his fence and kept the rabbit enclosed.
In the meantime a cat - which at the time I didn't know was his - was, and still is, a regular visitor to my garden day and night where it poos much more offensively and stalks the birds at my feeders.
I really don't think he understood the hypocrisy of his request

I respect the rights of everyone to have a pet as there are no laws against it (now there's a debate for another day) but I do not think pets of any description should be allowed to roam freely where they are a problem to others
 
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PYRTLE

Old Berkshire Boy
In the meantime a cat - which at the time I didn't know was his - was, and still is, a regular visitor to my garden day and night where it poos much more offensively and stalks the birds at my feeders.

If his cat is still using your garden as a latrine, have you mentioned this at all? Perhaps you are polite and don't wish to cause any neighbourly ill feeling so you put up with it.

Me, I would happily remove the cat poo using a trowel back to the owners garden, varying the location of the projectile day by day.
 

Farnboro John

Well-known member
Unusually for me, I'm on the fence here as my local cats help suppress the invasive alien Brown Rats, so they are moderately welcome in my garden. (I was definitely tickled when Dolly the tabby dumped one on the glass roof of a neighbour's conservatory.)

I don't actually feed the birds but they find a lot of insects and as far as I can tell woof down a lot of Buddleia seed. The Blackbirds like the Holly berries. I keep the ground-level cover to an absolute minimum including trimming off low branches, so ambushing birds is pretty difficult. Hopefully difficult enough: I've never seen any of the cats catch a bird in my garden.

John
 

keith

Well-known member
When I was a young lad, it was a common sight to see packs of dogs roaming the streets, people used to put them out when they went to work. Then the mindset changed, it was discouraged, these days it's unusual to see a dog running loose, probably escaped, hopefully, the cat problem will go the same way.
 

etudiant

Registered User
Supporter
When I was a young lad, it was a common sight to see packs of dogs roaming the streets, people used to put them out when they went to work. Then the mindset changed, it was discouraged, these days it's unusual to see a dog running loose, probably escaped, hopefully, the cat problem will go the same way.

Nice idea, but cats are nocturnal more than dogs, plus they tend to be solitary hunters, unlike dogs. so it is much more difficult to monitor stray cats.
I'd like to share your optimism that the social mindset will change and end this wildlife scourge, but thus far no change is evident.
 

John Cantelo

Well-known member
:-C Yet the biggest parasite is HUMANS!!!! It's always easier to find something else to blame.

I'm less interested in where the blame lies than doing something about those issues, such as free-ranging cats, where we both know what the problems are and how they can be relatively simply resolved. In this case, it's fairly simple - don't let your moggie out to kill wildlife, impose themselves on others' gardens, etc. Sorting out the more significant problem of human overpopulation is a lot harder but that doesn't mean we shouldn't address those issues that can be resolved.
 

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