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Micro ID - look here first (1 Viewer)

Surreybirder

Ken Noble
There are so many requests for micro IDs - and so many of them keep coming up - that I wondered whether it might be a good idea to have a micro ID thread.
My idea is that all who would like to should post pictures of some of the commoner, easier micros that most moth'ers will catch. If it works, all who want to should be able gradually to learn some of the commoner species - and hopefully be better equipped to know when something less common or harder to ID comes along.
I don't, personally, have masses of great micro photos but I thought I'd start with ones that I have that are reasonably common at this time of the year.

After discussion with robinm from the mods we have agreed that in order to keep this thread as clear as possible any posts that are not photos of micros with an id will be removed or moved. If you disagree with any ids please post here but any such posts will be removed once the id has been agreed.

If anyone else thinks this is a good idea, please post your pix!
Ken

Agapeta hamana
Aphomia sociella
Archips xylosteana
Aleimma loeflingiana
do. (ligher exampel)
 

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Surreybirder

Ken Noble
Let me know if I've got any of them wrong!

Anthophila fabriciana
Pseudargyrotoza conwagana
Chrysoteuchia culmella (Thanks, Angus)
Epiphyas postvittana
Hofmannophila pseudospretella
 

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Surreybirder

Ken Noble
Plutella xylostella
Pyrausta aurata
Udea olivalis
Celypha lacunana
do.


That's me - all micro-ed out.
 

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Brian Stone

A Stone chatting
Esperia sulphurella

A common and pretty dayflying moth seen mostly in April. Hangs around rotting wood but can turn up anywhere.
 

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Surreybirder

Ken Noble
Here's a few more:
20-plume moth (2 examples) - Alucita hexadactyla - can be seen at almost any time of the year
Elophila nymphaeata - brown china-mark
Epiblema cynosbatella - flies in May and June - distinctive orange 'punk' hair-do!
 

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davidg

Well-known member
OK, some from me:

0246 Tinea semifulvella
0247 Tinea trinotella
0450 Scythropia crataegella
0483 Epermenia chaerophyllella
0640 Batia lunaris

More when I get time.

David
 

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david avis

Birding by name
Here's one which was identified by Charly which I got last week;
Chrysoteuchia culmella
 

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Surreybirder

Ken Noble
thanks, David and David!
A couple more:
Epinotia immundana has a distinctive white diamond on its back - sometimes!
Bramble-shoot moth (Epiblema udmanniana) has a clear black shape - not unlike a mini-cooper!
 

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david avis

Birding by name
(Surreybirder) Is Aphomia sociella also known as the Bee Moth? If so how come it's so large and is still a micro? I guess it's the sort of thing I ought to know. My Bee Moth pic attached (I think).
 

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Surreybirder

Ken Noble
Hi, David, yes Aphomia sociella is also known as the bee moth because its larvae feeds on honey combs.
Ken
 
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wendelio

wendelio
A few more here that might be of interest.
652 Alabonia geoffrella
Meal Moth
1001 Lozotaeniodes formosanus
1002 4 spot tortrix Lozotaeniodes forsterana
and
462 Ypsolopha sequella also know locally as the playboy bunny moth!
 

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Brian Stone

A Stone chatting
Juniper Webber Dichomeris marginella

Quick look at a favourite of mine which should be on the wing now. Looks a bit like one of the crambids (pyralidae) but is a gelechid. Distinctive brown and white markings continue onto the furry 'nose'.
 

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Surreybirder

Ken Noble
small magpie - Eurrhypara hortulata - very common
magpie - Abraxas grossulariata - (not a micro but main confusion species) - decidely uncommon where I live but common in parts of Scotland at least.
Also, a slightly fresher example of Lozotaenia forsterana
 

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Brian Stone

A Stone chatting
(Surreybirder) Is Aphomia sociella also known as the Bee Moth? If so how come it's so large and is still a micro? I guess it's the sort of thing I ought to know. My Bee Moth pic attached (I think).

Micros are not necessarily all that small and are often considerably bigger than some macros. Large Tabby Aglossa pinguinalis is one of the largest and is a fairly common pyralid.

Other largish pyralids include Mother 0f Pearl Pleuroptya ruralis seen here with a Short-cloaked Moth Nola cucullatella (macro) and Thistle Ermine Myelois circumvoluta here posing with a Round-winged Muslin Thumatha senex (also a macro).
 

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robhope

Well-known member
Five from me

Five Micros from me that are easy to ID (relatively!):-

1. Endotricha flammealis
2. European Corn-borer
3. Rusty Dot Pearl
4. Small China-mark
5. Udea prunalis

If every summer cloud has a silver lining, it must be the chance to review all the Micros that I have photographed over the last two years but have not tried to ID because of the more 'sexy' Macros.

robhope

Egrets, I've had a few
 

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Surreybirder

Ken Noble
Anyone got a pic of Carcina quercana - that's another sp. that comes up frequently -- and how about Diurnea fagella ?
 

Brian Stone

A Stone chatting
Carcina quercana

Not the most brilliant shot I'm afraid. Lovely moth.
 

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davidg

Well-known member
Diurne fagella and March Moth

Light and dark vesions of Diurnea fagella plus confusion species that I've never caught locally, the macro March Moth.

David
 

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davidg

Well-known member
No new moths to look at so here's some old ones - several of the Bryotrophas.

1. Bryotropha affinis
2. Bryotropha similis
3. Bryotropha senectella
4. Bryotropha terrella
5. Bryotropha domestica

David
 

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