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Poncho vs. Rain Jacket and Pants (1 Viewer)

BruceBerman

Well-known member
For birding in hot, humid and wet countries, would you suggest wearing a poncho, perhaps with gaiters, or rain jacket and pants. I carry binocs and a bridge camera around my neck.
 
So this comes to Question #2. I don't want to hold an umbrella and I can't find a hands-free umbrella that is not silver, which would alarm birds. Any suggestions there?
Umbrella is invaluable. Bigger the better. Difficult to bird in "proper" rain forest without one.
 

But it still doesn't answer question of how to hold umbrella while holding phone/Merlin, camera, and binos?
In India, recently, I met some Europeans who had black, hands-free umbrellas that were held in place by straps on their vest. I thought it would be easy to find these on line, but no luck so far. Heading to Indonesia for 2 months so I figure I should figure out the best way to handle birding in the rain.
 
I'm missing something here lol
Large Umbrella?!

It's going to get caught in branches, reduces your vision, especially upwards.

Sounds cumbersome.

How about a wide rimmed hat, waterproof coat and trousers, gaitors, and a binocular rain guard
Yes obviously if you go much off piste. But usually you're on a path... The problem with the other solutions is they really don't allow you to continue birding in a downpour. They also don't protect as well in really heavy rain. In those circs you won't be walking around much anyway
 
Yes obviously if you go much off piste. But usually you're on a path... The problem with the other solutions is they really don't allow you to continue birding in a downpour. They also don't protect as well in really heavy rain. In those circs you won't be walking around much anyway
Yes, I'm sure it works fine when there is little wind, no narrow paths, no birds overhead etc.

I have tried a fishing umbrella pegged down for seawatching, never again. I actually missed birds, going over / behind me. I subsequently settled on getting slightly wet, and seeing the birds.

My bigger problem, that an umbrella would solve, is how to keep the eyepieces dry, once your cleaning cloth is soaked, in extreme cases
 
Yes, I'm sure it works fine when there is little wind, no narrow paths, no birds overhead etc.

I have tried a fishing umbrella pegged down for seawatching, never again. I actually missed birds, going over / behind me. I subsequently settled on getting slightly wet, and seeing the birds.

My bigger problem, that an umbrella would solve, is how to keep the eyepieces dry, once your cleaning cloth is soaked, in extreme cases
Like I said, an umbrella is pretty much essential in tropical conditions
 
Not necessary for something so expensive, and this looks a bit small. Basically, get the largest possible which still folds relatively compactly. Around £10
Yes the Montbell umbrella is (relatively) pricey. I own one and it's for trekkers/backpackers who want absolute smallest size and weight. It's top-drawer product and I'm sure you could do better if those parameters are not important. That said, I'd buy another w/out hesitation ;-)
 
Various kits for hands free seem available. For example:

(Fairly expensive)

Various kits for hands free seem available. For example:

(Fairly expensive)
Great, thanks! This is what I couldn't find.
 
I'm missing something here lol
Large Umbrella?!

It's going to get caught in branches, reduces your vision, especially upwards.

Sounds cumbersome.

How about a wide rimmed hat, waterproof coat and trousers, gaitors, and a binocular rain guard
It would be another arrow in my quiver. In India we were walking along trails where there was plenty of room for an umbrella. I believe, but am not certain, that when affixed to a vest the umbrella moves backwards when a birder bends a bit at the waist to look up. Definitely would also have the other items you mentioned...or a poncho.
 
It would be another arrow in my quiver. In India we were walking along trails where there was plenty of room for an umbrella. I believe, but am not certain, that when affixed to a vest the umbrella moves backwards when a birder bends a bit at the waist to look up. Definitely would also have the other items you mentioned...or a poncho.
maybe a longer spike, so it could be just stuck into the ground, if you are stationary.
Would at least be easier to move away from it / detach yourself if you needed to look up, or dive into dense bushes :) the things we often do!
 
Yes, I'm sure it works fine when there is little wind, no narrow paths, no birds overhead etc.

I have tried a fishing umbrella pegged down for seawatching, never again. I actually missed birds, going over / behind me. I subsequently settled on getting slightly wet, and seeing the birds.

My bigger problem, that an umbrella would solve, is how to keep the eyepieces dry, once your cleaning cloth is soaked, in extreme cases
An item in my birding equipment repertoire is a Rocket Air Blaster, which a guide I'd hired in Costa Rica used. This will get most of the water droplets off of your glass and then you can use your cleaning cloth to absorb what is left.
 
Yes, I'm sure it works fine when there is little wind, no narrow paths, no birds overhead etc.

I have tried a fishing umbrella pegged down for seawatching, never again. I actually missed birds, going over / behind me. I subsequently settled on getting slightly wet, and seeing the birds.

My bigger problem, that an umbrella would solve, is how to keep the eyepieces dry, once your cleaning cloth is soaked, in extreme cases


👍

John
 

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