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AOU 2018 Checklist proposals (1 Viewer)

Larry Sweetland

Formerly 'Larry Wheatland'
On my list I call it American Moorhen. Simple. Same with American Treecreeper

Way to go! If you think the authorities have given something a silly name, just call it something else. No problem �� if our pals inthe US want to call Scytalopus species Fawcetaculos that's fine by me.
 
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Kirk Roth

Well-known member
FYI, it's been confirmed that the name change for Gray Jay has passed, and it will now be known as Canada Jay.

It's also been confirmed, on a related note, that proposals to change the name of Rock Pigeon and Common Gallinule failed.

I need to ask the obvious - where has this been confirmed?
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
Way to go! If you think the authorities have given something a silly name, just call it something else. No problem �� if our pals inthe US want to call Scytalopus species Fawcetaculos that's fine by me.

It's fine by me too as long as they don't foist their names on everyone else!

I see the Europeans have dropped in line on such as 'Longspur' and there are others.


A
 

Kratter

Well-known member
It's fine by me too as long as they don't foist their names on everyone else!

I see the Europeans have dropped in line on such as 'Longspur' and there are others.


A

Nobody's "foisting." If you choose to follow a taxonomy (e.g., NACC, SACC) based on an authorities in the Americas, that is your prerogative. If your country chooses to disband their taxonomic committee, that is not a problem of the NACC/SACC Clements,, the IOC, HBW or any other taxonomic authority. If you and Nutcracker and other Brits get so worked up on the declining use of British English names in ornithology, then go form a Committee of your own.

Andy
 

Mysticete

Well-known member
United States
Nobody's "foisting." If you choose to follow a taxonomy (e.g., NACC, SACC) based on an authorities in the Americas, that is your prerogative. If your country chooses to disband their taxonomic committee, that is not a problem of the NACC/SACC Clements,, the IOC, HBW or any other taxonomic authority. If you and Nutcracker and other Brits get so worked up on the declining use of British English names in ornithology, then go form a Committee of your own.

Andy

HARSH...but also true and hilarious...:)
 
Nobody's "foisting." If you choose to follow a taxonomy (e.g., NACC, SACC) based on an authorities in the Americas, that is your prerogative. If your country chooses to disband their taxonomic committee, that is not a problem of the NACC/SACC Clements,, the IOC, HBW or any other taxonomic authority. If you and Nutcracker and other Brits get so worked up on the declining use of British English names in ornithology, then go form a Committee of your own.

Andy

Or submit proposals to NACC/ SACC to change names or reverse name changes when you can show the justification for doing so. Anyone, of any nationality can do that, and it will be voted on. Once accepted by the AOU it is more, or very often, likely to be adopted by other authorities (IOC and Clements that most World listers currently follow).

For me Moorhen is a great name but it doesn't apply to the U.S. in any sense after that was fixed with the chloropus/ galeatus split, voted up by the AOU.

So, just what are the names that are being *foisted*. I'd like to know which current names are causing these sporadic bitter outbursts.:eek!::eek!:
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
Nobody's "foisting." If you choose to follow a taxonomy (e.g., NACC, SACC) based on an authorities in the Americas, that is your prerogative. If your country chooses to disband their taxonomic committee, that is not a problem of the NACC/SACC Clements,, the IOC, HBW or any other taxonomic authority. If you and Nutcracker and other Brits get so worked up on the declining use of British English names in ornithology, then go form a Committee of your own.

Andy

Us getting worked up, did you see the debate at the link, it's every bit as partisan!



A
 

Andy Adcock

Well-known member
England
Or submit proposals to NACC/ SACC to change names or reverse name changes when you can show the justification for doing so. Anyone, of any nationality can do that, and it will be voted on. Once accepted by the AOU it is more, or very often, likely to be adopted by other authorities (IOC and Clements that most World listers currently follow).

For me Moorhen is a great name but it doesn't apply to the U.S. in any sense after that was fixed with the chloropus/ galeatus split, voted up by the AOU.

So, just what are the names that are being *foisted*. I'd like to know which current names are causing these sporadic bitter outbursts.:eek!::eek!:

Loon, Longspur, Jaeger etc.............

Read my comment above and look at the links to the debate on name changes, you guys are every bit as exercised as some of us so don't pretend you're not.

I've never applied Moorhen for American birds as I said, the IOC split it so both are on and I refer when I use the word 'foist' to the changes that are creeping in to the European filedguides more than checklists.

A
 

fugl

Well-known member
What will you do, impose sanctions if we don't use your names.....8-P

We might if we cared what names Europen field guides use but we don’t so you have nothing to fear. . .. That said, how anyone could prefer a vanilla name like “diver” to “loon” with its evocation of crazy calls in the northern wilderness is beyond me!
 
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DMW

Well-known member
We might if we cared what names Europen field guides use but we don’t so you have nothing to fear. . .. That said, how anyone could prefer a vanilla name like “diver” to “loon” with its evocation of crazy calls in the northern wilderness is beyond me!

Probably because for most of us on this side of the Pond, 99.9% of the divers we see are distant (and silent) blobs in a scope!
 

fugl

Well-known member
Probably because for most of us on this side of the Pond, 99.9% of the divers we see are distant (and silent) blobs in a scope!

A fair point and a strong reason not to standardize common names but let each region stick to its own.
 
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Farnboro John

Well-known member
We might if we cared what names Europen field guides use but we don’t so you have nothing to fear. . .. That said, how anyone could prefer a vanilla name like “diver” to “loon” with its evocation of crazy calls in the northern wilderness is beyond me!

Because once you've announced "Great Northern", the milder ring of "Diver" doesn't matter, whereas "Common Loon" should be in an asylum.

Either way it's a corking sound, hugely evocative of wilderness. It's just that mostly in British waters they are silent. First ones I heard were sharing Portland Harbour with a Brunnich's Guillemot, if you know what that is on the West side of the Atlantic..... ;)

John
 

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