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How is your 2018 List Going? (1 Viewer)

Nightjar61

David Daniels
United States
Yesterday I added two birds to my Year List, bringing me up to 302 for the year.

301. Clay-colored Sparrow
302. Connecticut Warbler

Dave
 

Reader

Well-known member
I've had my first for Warwickshire today at Napton Reservoir with two Grey Phalarope's.

186. Grey Phalarope
 

Nightjar61

David Daniels
United States
Friday night a cold front brought large numbers of fall migrants. Yesterday I saw four species of vireos and 14 species of wood warblers. Out of those birds, I added two species to my Year List.

303. Philadelphia Vireo
304. Orange-crowned Warbler

An then today I added another uncommon fall migrant to my list.

305. Gray-cheeked Thrush

Dave
 

Tero

Retired
233 Bay-breasted Warbler - Setophaga castanea
234 Black-throated Green Warbler - Setophaga virens
 

Andy Hurley

Opus Editor
Opus Editor
Supporter
Scotland
A week on Langeoog (German North Sea island) saw some massive flocks 1000+ of various waders and added the following to my year list:

169 Common Eider
170 Common Ringed Plover
171 Little Stint
172 Black Swan
173 European Golden Plover
174 Whimbrel
175 Common Gull
176 Jack Snipe
177 Common Sand Martin
178 Grey Plover
179 Red Knot
180 Common Sandpiper
181 Rock Pipit
182 Red Throated Pipit L
183 Ruff

I'm getting close to 1000 on my life list, just 9 to go...
 
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Nightjar61

David Daniels
United States
This morning I went to a large reservoir in a neighboring county to chase a couple of local rarities. I easily found both targets.

306. Common Tern

The second, Sanderling, was not a new bird for the year because I saw the species in Jamaica last March, but it was a new bird for my ABA Area and West Virginia year lists. The tern was also a state lifer (no. 276), my eighth of the year.

Then on my way home, I stopped by one of my local patches and picked up another new bird for the year.

307. Marsh Wren

Dave
 

Tero

Retired
233. Bay-breasted Warbler - Setophaga castanea Wagon Train RA
234. Black-throated Green Warbler - Setophaga virens Wagon Train RA
235. Pileated Woodpecker - Dryocopus pileatus Castlewood SP US-MO
236. Carolina Chickadee - Poecile carolinensis Castlewood SP US-MO
237. Northern Mockingbird - Mimus polyglottos Creve Coeur Lake
238. Eurasian Tree Sparrow - Passer montanus Creve Coeur Lake
 

Tero

Retired
239 Broad-winged Hawk - Buteo platypterus Branched Oak SRA
240 LeConte's Sparrow - Ammospiza leconteii Marsh Wren Community Wetlands
 

Nightjar61

David Daniels
United States
One new bird this morning brings me up to 309 for the year.

309. Nashville Warbler

I have now seen all of the regularly occurring wood warblers in West Virginia this year.

For some reason, I seem to struggle to find this bird most years. I should have seen it during spring migration, but I found it with literally only about a week--two weeks at most--before they've all left for the season.

Dave
 
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Tero

Retired
One new bird this morning brings me up to 309 for the year.

309. Nashville Warbler

I have now seen all of the regularly occurring wood warblers in West Virginia this year.

For some reason, I seem to struggle to find this bird most years. I should have seen it during spring migration, but I found it with literally only about a week--two weeks at most--before they've all left for the season.

Dave
That's a surprise. I did not realize there was any difference in the Eastern part. I will go out in May, and other than spring yellowrumps, I expect to see Nashvilles and Yellow warbler first.
 

birdmeister

Well-known member
United States
That's a surprise. I did not realize there was any difference in the Eastern part. I will go out in May, and other than spring yellowrumps, I expect to see Nashvilles and Yellow warbler first.

I have never found Nashville to be common in migration here. I think I had fewer than five for the entire year.
 

Jacana

Will Jones
Hungary
Last weekend a few hours north of Uppsala. Turned into a productive day!

514. Great Grey Shrike
515. Siberian Jay
516. Black Grouse
517. Hazel Grouse
518. Western Capercaillie
 

Nightjar61

David Daniels
United States
That's a surprise. I did not realize there was any difference in the Eastern part. I will go out in May, and other than spring yellowrumps, I expect to see Nashvilles and Yellow warbler first.

I’ve found Nashville Warblers to be quite common when I’ve birded out west in Arizona and California. Even when I lived in Indiana, they were scarce.

Dave
 

Jacana

Will Jones
Hungary
Cleaning up some fairly easy birds today on Björn, off the Uppland coast. No exciting rarities though this time.

520. Eurasian Rock Pipit
521. Velvet Scoter
522. Short-eared Owl
523. Black Guillemot
524. Snow Bunting
 

Tero

Retired
241 correction:grasshopper sparrow. It did not pass as either for eBird, who are pretty picky, but grasshopper is more likely that time that location
 

AlexC

Opus Editor
Opus Editor
Supporter
A week in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico and surrounding areas for a much needed respite:
377. White-winged Dove
378. Common Ground-Dove
379. Gilded Flicker
380. Prairie Falcon
381. Crested Caracara
382. Gila Woodpecker
383. Scott’s Oriole
384. Xantus’s Hummingbird (lifer)
385. Black-headed Grosbeak
386. Gray Thrasher (lifer)
387. Magnificent Frigatebird
388. Groove-billed Ani (lifer)

And then back in SoCal, some hiking in Ojai:
389. Hutton’s Vireo
 
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