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New Product Introduction Today From Swarovski ? (1 Viewer)

elkcub

Silicon Valley, California
United States
Does anyone know the eye relief specs for the new models?
Do they use field flattener lenses?

Ed
 
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NDhunter

Experienced observer
United States
The 'lowish' transmission figure is likely due to the amount of glass required to achieve those large AFov's.

Also Swarovski's never feel 'cheap' in the hand - for that you'll have to grab a Zeiss SF ....... :smoke:






Chosun :gh:

Chosun: Do you think you will be able to try any of these you mention? ;)
As in, why ?

Jerry
 

NDhunter

Experienced observer
United States
It is good Swarovski has introduced a new flagship, this was expected.

What is a surprise is the large price increase over anything else. The reviews to come will
be interesting.

Jerry
 

John A Roberts

Well-known member
Australia
Below is the full text from the Fieldsports News post at: https://www.fieldsportschannel.tv/swarovski-bets-on-field-of-view-with-nl-pure/

At this point it seems to be the most comprehensive statement - and several points have already been referred to in earlier posts in this thread

- - - -

Swarovski bets on field of view with NL Pure binos
June 30, 2020

Forget light transmission, forget ease-of-use – they are last year’s optic USPs. Swarovski’s three new binocular launches pushes a new boundary: it’s all about field of view.

With its NL Pure, launched on 1 July 2020, Swarovski wants to immerse you in your view by offering a market-leading 71-degree ‘apparent’ field of view.
No detail on why the use of the word ‘apparent’ but the new binos are a lens system the same as the Swarovski EL, so it is not digital manipulation.

“In the past, we have talked about edge-to-edge sharpness,” says Swarovski spokesman Wolfgang Schwarz. “But there is one thing that’s even better – no edges at all.”

The 8×42 NL Pure field of view is 159 metres at 1,000 metres. The 10×42 offers 20% more field of view that the Swarovski EL 8×42. And, for the first time, Swarovski is offering a 12×42,
an NL Pure that has a field of view with 130 metres at 1,000 metres that beats the EL 10×42’s 112 metres at 1,000 metres.

And did we say forget light transmission, forget ease of use? Forget that. Handling is still a thing. By rotating the prisms to right angles, Swarovski has slimmed down the middle of the tubes.
That helps the NL Pure fit your hands more easily.

Light transmission is 91%, the same as the Leica Geovid and 1 point down on the Zeiss SF.

The NL Pure 8×42 weighs 840g, which is about 10% more than the Zeiss SF 8×42. but more than 10% less than the Leica Geovid 8×42’s hefty 950g.

Shipping begins 1 September 2020. Price is €2,850 in Austria and US$3,299 in the USA for the 8×42.

The NL Pure is not a replacement for the Swarovski EL binoculars – ‘don’t mess with the legend,’ they tell us gravely – but Swarovski staff point out that the new model is better.

- - - -

So beside the specifications, of most interest is:
• The reference to rotating the prisms 90 degrees to enable the more ergonomic design, and

• That the NL is not replacing the EL (and nor presumedly the lower priced SLC)


And it’s probably useful to add:
- The apparent field of view is no mystery, it's the combination of the actual/ angular field of view, together with the effect of the magnification provided by the eyepiece

- Saying that the lens system is the same as the EL, is not saying that the lenses are identical, and

- The listed transmission of 91% is one percent more than that of the EL, and the same as that of the x42 SLC's


John
 
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NDhunter

Experienced observer
United States
Below is the full text from the Fieldsports News post at: https://www.fieldsportschannel.tv/swarovski-bets-on-field-of-view-with-nl-pure/

At this point it seems to be the most comprehensive statement - and several points have already been referred to in earlier posts in this thread

- - - -

Swarovski bets on field of view with NL Pure binos
June 30, 2020

Forget light transmission, forget ease-of-use – they are last year’s optic USPs. Swarovski’s three new binocular launches pushes a new boundary: it’s all about field of view.

With its NL Pure, launched on 1 July 2020, Swarovski wants to immerse you in your view by offering a market-leading 71-degree ‘apparent’ field of view.
No detail on why the use of the word ‘apparent’ but the new binos are a lens system the same as the Swarovski EL, so it is not digital manipulation.

“In the past, we have talked about edge-to-edge sharpness,” says Swarovski spokesman Wolfgang Schwarz. “But there is one thing that’s even better – no edges at all.”

The 8×42 NL Pure field of view is 159 metres at 1,000 metres. The 10×42 offers 20% more field of view that the Swarovski EL 8×42. And, for the first time, Swarovski is offering a 12×42,
an NL Pure that has a field of view with 130 metres at 1,000 metres that beats the EL 10×42’s 112 metres at 1,000 metres.

And did we say forget light transmission, forget ease of use? Forget that. Handling is still a thing. By rotating the prisms to right angles, Swarovski has slimmed down the middle of the tubes.
That helps the NL Pure fit your hands more easily.

Light transmission is 91%, the same as the Leica Geovid and 1 point down on the Zeiss SF.

The NL Pure 8×42 weighs 840g, which is about 10% more than the Zeiss SF 8×42. but more than 10% less than the Leica Geovid 8×42’s hefty 950g.

Shipping begins 1 September 2020. Price is €2,850 in Austria and US$3,299 in the USA for the 8×42.

The NL Pure is not a replacement for the Swarovski EL binoculars – ‘don’t mess with the legend,’ they tell us gravely – but Swarovski staff point out that the new model is better.

- - - -

So beside the specifications, of most interest is:
• The reference to rotating the prisms 90 degrees (?) to enable the more ergonomic design, and

• That the NL is not replacing the EL (and nor presumedly the lower priced SLC)


And it’s probably useful to add:
- The apparent field of view is no mystery, it's the combination of the actual/ angular field of view, together with the effect of the magnification provided by the eyepiece

- Saying that the lens system is the same as the EL, is not saying that the lenses are identical, and

- The listed transmission of 91% is one percent more than that of the EL's, and the same as that of the x42 SLC's




John

John:

Not sure about what is your "expert" summation and what is from the official Swarovsk link , from your post.

I think you should stay on point, and you don't know.......:smoke:

Jerry
 

Chosun Juan

Given to Fly
Australia - Aboriginal
John:

Not sure about what is your "expert" summation and what is from the official Swarovsk link , from your post.

I think you should stay on point, and you don't know.......:smoke:

Jerry
Jerry,

John's post seems 'crystal' clear to me ....... :smoke:
;)





Chosun :gh:
 

Chosun Juan

Given to Fly
Australia - Aboriginal
A 408 ft. FOV on 10x is bigger than most 8X'S! WOW! I had my stack of money sitting on the table with a note Zeiss SF now I am changing the note to Swaro's!
Ask Lee how much more 'area' you'll be able to see with that vs Zeiss SF 10x42 with its 'paltry 360ft !!! :-O
Great field of view figures, no question of that, and they have moved the focus wheel to the same position as Zeiss SF so I guess Chosun Juan will be unhappy with this forced position. The emphasis on ergonomics seems like an attempt to catch up with the progress made by SF and the deletion of the hinge by the objectives hints at a similar shift in balance to that achieved by SF too. No doubt it will be a fine instrument and I look forward to trying one out. Shame about the weight though.

Lee

Dennis, it seems that Lee is crying into his porridge and can't bring himself to do the math !

The 10x Dutch special puts SF in the shade to the tune of up to and more than 28% viewable field area !! ..... no wonder Lee is in stunned silence, has taken 2 Bex and is having a good lie down ! :-O

I have to agree with Lee though :eek!: - the ergonomics do look similarly contrived hands forward as with SF ....... :-C

Where Lee has got it wrong though - is that the elimination of the forward bridge is a welcome inspiration from the Nikon Monarch HG (though those with blue tinted glasses to match their suede shoes could possibly claim HT too ....)







Chosun :gh:
 

Troubador

Moderator
Staff member
Supporter
So EL lives on. But it has been replaced! It is no longer Swarovski's top binocular and has been replaced by NL with a focus wheel position clearly inspired by SF (and HT) and with SF's focus on balance and comfort. In fact the super-wide field of view suggests heavy eyepieces and with a little weight taken out from the objectives-end by the deletion of the bridge there, it looks like it will have the same eyepiece-heavy balance as SF especially given the hand position mandated by the focus wheel position and hourglass body. Add the monster field of view, which SF 42 and SF32 also came with and Swarovski couldn't have replaced EL with a better tribute to the path that SF has already trodden.

The monster field of view is impressive, the 850g weight (30ozs) less so.
Has anyone seen an Eye Relief data?
12x42 is intriguing. 12x50 might have been too heavy to contemplate.

Looking forward to trying one out.

Lee
 
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Arek

Well-known member
There is some inconsistency in eye relief data. Technical data tables shown in their webpage give 20 mm, but PDF with technical data shows 18 mm.
 

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